Prototype Information: the Eustis locomotives

The notes on individual locomotives were originally collated and published by Chuck Collins, and are re-published here with his permission. The introduction, updates and formatting for this blog by Terry Smith.

The Eustis Railroad

The Eustis Railroad was chartered in 1903 by the P&R and ran from a junction with the P&R at Eustis Junction some 15 or so miles to Berlin Mills and Skunk Brook Camp via Dago Junction. It was primarily a logging line to transport the forest to Boston as lumber and lumber products.

The railroad and its locomotives were merged into the Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad company in January 1911, delayed by financial considerations and the company ceased to exist as a separate entity.

Eustis #7

Baldwin #23245 built 11/1903 as Eustis #7.

Configuration: 28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #7 (1903-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #20 (1911 – 1936).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the first of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #20 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in 1917. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Used as a standby engine until damaged in a wreck on 22 November 1922. Thereafter stored outdoors unrepaired and scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

Eustis #8

Baldwin #23754 built 2/1904 as Eustis #8.
Configuration:
28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.
This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #8 (1904-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #21 (1911 – 1935).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the second of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #21 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in June 1917. Burned in the 3 October 1917 Rangeley engine house fire. Fitted with electric headlight in December 1920. Burned in the 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used sparingly as a standby engine until it broke a driver axle in 1932. Scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

Eustis #9

Baldwin #23755 built 2/1904 as Eustis #9.

Configuration: 28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #9 (1904-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #22 (1911 – 1935).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the third of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #22 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in 1917. Fitted with electric headlight in 1920. Struck an automobile near Rangeley on 17 September 1920 in the only documented grade crossing fatality of the Maine 2 foot gauge railroads. Burned in the 12 February 1923 Phillips enginehouse fire. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used sparingly as a standby engine. Stored outdoors at Phillips following abandonment of service to Rangeley. Scrapped in 1935.

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