Prototype Information: the P&R locomotives

The notes on individual locomotives were originally collated and published by Chuck Collins, and are re-published here with his permission. The introduction, updates and formatting for this blog by Terry Smith. Updated 15-01-2015.

The Phillips and Rangeley Railroad

The Phillips and Rangeley Railroad started building in 1889 from an end-on junction with the Sandy River Railroad at Phillips and ran the 29 miles to Rangeley. It was financed by Boston business men who owned forests north of the line in order to get their lumber products to the Boston markets. The railroad finally reached Rangeley in July 1891.

The P&R chartered the Madrid Railroad in 1902 as a paper company which was wholly owned and operated by the P&R, and which never owned any locomotives or rolling stock. It ran for 15 miles from a junction with the parent P&R at Madrid Junction to Bracket Junction and ended as two forks reaching Gray’s Farm and a logging camp called No. Six.

In 1903 the P&R chartered the Eustis Railroad as a wholly owned subsidiary company. It ran from a junction with the P&R at Eustis Junction some 15 or so miles to Berlin Mills and Skunk Brook Camp via Dago Junction, and owned its own locomotives.

The P&R and its subsidiaries formed one of the two major groups that finally merged to become the Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad company in January 1908 (the Eustis excepted) and ceased to exist as a separate entities. The Eustis line joined the consolidation later in 1911.

P&R #1

Portland #615 built 10/1890 as Phillips and Rangeley #1 Calvin Putnam.

18 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
34″ diameter 140psi boiler
10.5″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank held 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #1 (1890 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #7 (1908 – 1935)

This engine was built in a joint order with Sandy River #4. The two engines reflected Portland Company’s execution of the pattern purchased from the defunct Hinkley Locomotive Works. This locomotive was 20% heavier than the engines Hinkley had built for the Bridgton & Saco River, Franklin & Megantic, and Monson railroads. It was the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine at the time of its delivery. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 5.5 tons per axle was a full ton greater than the Hinkley design. This Portland design proved to be the most successful and enduring for the Maine 2 foot gauge railroads. Forty years later, locomotives of this design pulled the final trains on the Kennebec Central, Monson, and Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington railroads. This engine was assigned to Phillips & Rangeley passenger service including through trains over the Sandy River during summer months. The original Portland cab was damaged in 1904 and replaced by a less ornate Baldwin style cab. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #7 in 1908 and used as a standby passenger engine following delivery of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #9 in 1909. Derailed at a washout between Kingfield and Salem on 15 April 1912. Rolled over with passenger train during low speed collision with another train at Strong on 8 July 1916. Little used following purchase of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #24 in 1919. Stored outdoors in 1923 and scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

P&R #2 (1st)

Hinkley #1261 built 1877 as Billerica & Bedford Puck.

12 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
30″ diameter 130psi boiler
8″x12″ cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank carried 400 gallons water and 1/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Billerica & Bedford #2 Puck (1878 – 1879) as a strict cab forward Forney design.

Sandy River #2 Echo (1879 – 1890) rebuilt as a conventional boiler first locomotive.

Phillips & Rangeley #2 Bo Peep (1890 – 1893)

Phillips & Rangeley #4 Bo Peep (1893 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #4 (1908 – 1912)

This locomotive was a reorder of the Billerica and Bedford Ariel design to be used as a standby engine. Built to run tank first. Purchased by Sandy River Railroad following dismantling of Billerica and Bedford Railroad. Rebuilt by the Hinkley Works in Boston in April 1879 as Sandy River Echo #2 running boiler first and using wood fuel. Used as Sandy River construction engine beginning 25 September 1879. Pulled the first passenger train to Strong 12 November 1879. Sold to Phillips and Rangeley Railroad as P&R #2 Bo Peep in July 1890 and used as Phillips and Rangeley construction engine. Renumbered Phillips & Rangeley #4 and used as a standby engine following purchase of Phillips & Rangeley 2nd #2 in 1893. Used for summer only passenger service between Rangeley and Green Farm upon completion of the Eustis Railroad in 1904. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #4 in 1908, but little used following discontinuance of Eustis branch passenger service in same year. Scrapped September 1912 as Maine Central Railroad modernized subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes locomotive fleet.

P&R #2 (2nd)

Baldwin #13276 built 3/1893 as Phillips & Rangeley second #2.

Configuration: 26 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
38″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
35″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #2 (2nd) (1893 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #17 (1908 – 1936)

For the third time in as many purchases, Phillips & Rangeley Railroad ordered what became the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 9 tons per axle was twice the loading of the Hinkley engines and almost 50% greater than Phillips & Rangeley #3. This engine similarly doubled the weight of the Hinkley design. Pulling power was similar to Phillips & Rangeley #3 mogul, but the absence of a separate tender made backing easier where no turntable was available. Sloshing water in partially filled leading tenders was subsequently blamed for several derailments on the rough track of logging branches. Phillips & Rangeley #2 proved well suited to branch line logging operations. Phillips & Rangeley management considered axle loading damage to track insignificant over the short useful life of logging branches. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #17 in 1908. Reboilered by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops in February 1915. The new 40″ diameter 180 PSI boiler increased engine weight to 28 tons and axle loading to 10 tons. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in December 1919. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used as a standby engine until the railroad was dismantled in 1935. Scrapped in 1936.

P&R #3

Baldwin #11706 built 3/1891 as Phillips & Rangeley #3 George M. Goodwin.

Configuration: 23 ton outside frame 2-6-0
42″ diameter 130psi boiler
13″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
15 ton tender held 1200 gallons water & 2 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #3 (1891 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #15 (1908 – 1935)

Rebuilt as a Prairie locomotive in 1912.

Phillips & Rangeley Railroad had again taken delivery of the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 6.3 tons per axle was 20% greater than Portland’s Phillips & Rangeley #1. The engine alone was 30% heavier than Phillips & Rangeley #1 and it was the first locomotive with a separate tender on the Maine two foot gauge railroads. Observation of its performance provided basis for the improved design later built for Laurel River & Hot Springs. Purchased to handle lumber traffic produced by the Redington sawmill. Used as the preferred Phillips & Rangeley freight engine. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #15 in 1908. Rebuilt in 1912 by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops as a 25 ton 2-6-2 with a 42″ diameter 180 PSI boiler, 12.5×16 inch cylinders, and a 19 ton tender. This was the first engine rebuilt by Maine Central, and results were observed and applied to future Mogul conversions. Boiler steam capacity was still inadequate for 12.5″ diameter cylinders. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Used in general freight service until it broke a driver axle 12 February 1923. Never repaired. Scrapped in 1935

P&R #4

The original #2 was re-numbered as  Phillips & Rangeley #4 (1905 -1908)

See entry for original #2 above for more details.

 

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