We are four, ……… with 4000 revisions!

It is four years since we went public with this blog. On that day, we started with just 36 topics/posts, mostly picture based, showing historic On2 layouts and some of the brass models that had been produced commercially.

The number of topics grew rapidly to over 110 by our first anniversary in 2014, and today, on our fourth anniversary the more rounded blog consists of 185 topics/posts and 4 pages.

What does not show publicly, are the numerous, often small additions and changes that occur as a result of additional information or understandings after a topic has been published. According to information contained within a management file, the Maine On2 FAQ’s blog is now close to having had some 4000 revisions since it was started.

While we try to identify and publicise major revisions of existing popular topics, these constant small revisions are one of the reasons why we encourage viewers to call back at intervals, as new information or pictures may be presented and errors or omissions corrected.

Thanks to all our contributors,

Terry, Matt and Trevor.

ps;- for those viewers who have not been exposed to the UK’s favourite TV Comedy sketch, and wonder why the heading sketch shows garden forks under the birthday cake, we would suggest clicking here.

Top posts for 2016

The editors would like to thank all the contributors for their material used in the past year, our most viewed so far, and also to wish them a Happy New Year. Visitor and viewing numbers for 2016 were the highest recorded within a full calendar year, both being up by more than 25% on the previous years figures.

Here are our most viewed posts for the calendar year 2016;-

#1 – Maine On2 layouts – Bob Harper’s Megantic module; published 15th February 2016.

#2- MaineOn2 layouts – Trevor Marshall’s Somerset & Piscataquis Counties RR.

#3 – Library of Congress – Vintage Aerial views; published 1st January 2016.

#4 – Maine On2 layouts – Bob Harper’s Franklin module; re-published on blog 26th   February 2016.

#5 –Maine On2 Layouts – Bob Brown’s Wiscasset dock.

#6 – Minimum radius and big Forneys – On30 version.

Yet again, this is a rather different listing compared to those of the previous years, with three of the top four positions being taken by new topics posted this year. Bob Harper earned a well deserved top placing with his new module Megantic which has now been shown at a number of UK venues, and he also placed fourth with his older Franklin module which made it across the pond to the National Narrow Gauge Convention at Augusta, Maine in September. In October, back in the UK, Franklin was awarded the David Lloyd Trophy for the “Best Layout in Show” by popular vote at the Expo Narrow Gauge Show held at Swanley, Kent. This is the biggest show in the UK devoted to small scale Narrow Gauge Railway Modelling.

The number of specific viewings of Megantic this year sets a new record for the highest number of views recorded within a calendar year, and it scored more than second and third places combined.

The nationality of viewers was pretty stable, with some 74% of the 2016 viewings being made from the USA, with the United Kingdom in second place with some 7% and Canada in third place with 5%.The blog has recorded visits from 73 different countries around the globe this year.

This year has seen the largest number of new topics posted within a calendar year, apart from our start up in 2013. This can be attributed to our chief scribe using his last year’s Christmas present to himself (50 years of the Gazette on DVD) to satisfy his own curiosity about the early days of commercial On2 in the 1970’s and sharing his findings on the blog.

We hope that our viewers have found the site of interest over the last year.

We have more topics and content in-process, so keep coming back in the coming year.

 

 

 

 

Photo setup 1 – a simple plain background

This topic is posted to support a current thread on the Maine On2 Yahoo! group.

One of the things that makes preparing pictures for this blog easier is if the subject has a simple plain background.

Take this picture as an example;-

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This is an example of what we call a “model documentation” type picture, where the aim is to show the model and it’s details. Note how a plain background does just this.

Note also the dust spots shown by the yellow arrows – which only appear when the DSLR that took this picture is used in aperture priority mode and takes pictures at f/32.

And here’s a picture showing the wider view of how that was achieved;-

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Note that the background and base to the model are clean sheets of white paper, as used by the computer printer. The background sheet is held in position by Scotch tape and a cardboard box (on edge). The base sheet is held in place by the weight of the model, supported by a familiar box from an SRCS kit, and drapes down to the table, giving a soft rolled over edge.

The lighting is simple summer sunlight, as shown by the garden behind.

 

 

Temporary Post: The Beeches Light Railway Carrabasset Parlor Car

This post is temporary to support a thread on the Maine On2 Yahoo! group. It does not form part of the Maine On2 FAQ’s, but is posted here for convenience.

Terry Smith writes: “we’ve just got back from our first caravan trip this year – to our favourite site in Wales – up in the hills near Tan Y Bwlch on the other side of the valley. So I’ve now seen the Beeches Light Railway’s Carrabasset Parlor Car on a daily (or more frequent) basis – it seems that it never moved for the whole week that we were passing by – it was stuck at Boston Lodge on the track leading to the passenger equipment storage sheds nearest to the sea. It was pretty visible, but very awkwardly placed for decent photographs. I did not want to trespass or climb over sea walls for better pictures.”

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General view of the Festiniog Railway’s Boston Lodge Works with the Carrabasset Parlor Car.

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Just in case there happens to be a question about the location…….

 

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Close – up view.

Update: 18 – May – 2016: while Carrabasset appeared to be stationary throughout my sojourn in the neighbourhood, it has been put to use at other times as on trips such as the Snowdonian and the Afternoon tea party. Click on the blue words to see the Festiniog Facebook pages showing these events.

Click here to visit the Wikipedia page for the Beeches Light Railway.

Click here for more pictures of the Carrabasset Parlor Car.

Update: 01-07-2016: for additional views of this car on another modellers’ site click here.

Yikes! …we are three!

Is it really three years since we made our first tentative public disclosures of this blog?.

Yikes! ……….They say that time flies when you are enjoying yourself – or is it because as you get older your perception of elapsed time changes and that you have many more distractions?

Update added 03 – April -2016;-

The anniversary post has previously contained a quick review of the past year – this year the anniversary seemed to come round a lot quicker than previous years (hence the Yikes!), and then other circumstances conspired to prevent me posting the review portion on the anniversary – but here goes.

Around 20 posts/topics have been added in the last year, split fairly equally between Maine Two Foot prototype data, and On2 modelling topics. A few were re-publications of topics from the old HTML version of the FAQ’s, but the majority were new topics.

 We were fortunate to be given permission to publish Dwight Smith’s pictures of his visit to Bridgton in 1940, the announcement of which resulted in our biggest one day surge of viewers and viewings after Day 1 (our all time record, so far).

The blog receives a spike in the viewers and viewings when a new topic is posted and/or an old topic is referenced on the MaineOn2 Yahoo! group board, so it would seem that the blog is functioning to support the group as we and our founder intended.

 

We hope that you have enjoyed your visits, and thanks to all our contributors (and not forgetting the administrators),

Terry, Matt and Trevor.

Editorial announcement: “What’s new?”

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For some time now, the “What’s New?” page, available from the fixed menu below the picture on the home page has looked a lot like the “What’s Here?” page.

A recent review has suggested that we should sharpen the focus of the “What’s New?” page and also for a trial period we will use this page to advise our followers and viewers of other news that may be of interest to them, such as new topics on other blogs, rather than posting a temporary message with or without “sticky” status on the main blog roll.

 

Terry, 15th January 2016