Maine On2 layouts – Ric Collin’s Phillips and Rangeley, circa 1914 – 1918

The editors gratefully acknowledge a number of informative postings by Chuck Collins to the MaineOn2 Yahoo group which have been edited and incorporated into this posting;-

Here is a little more On2 history. My brother Ric and I first started modeling the Maine two footers in 1961 after reading Allan Hanson’s article “The Sandy River Goes HOn2” in the April 1961 issue of Model  Railroad Craftsman. We began modeling in HOn2. In 1970 we switched to On2 so we could get more detail in our models.

These pictures were taken on Ric Collins’ now defunct SR&RL On2 railroad. Ric’s railroad depicted the SR&RL circa 1914-1918 and modeled the line from Phillips, Maine to Rangeley, Maine. The pictures were taken in the early 1990’s before Ric had to dismantle the railroad because of a move. It was never rebuilt.

The rumors of my demise have been greatly exaggerated. My name is Chuck Collins and I was the one that ran Narrow Gauge Specialties. I am still in this world for now but not sure for how long. My brother Ric Collins is also still living. Neither of us model in On2 anymore. We are both involved in small scale live steam trains.

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SR&RL #9 at Madrid.

Wes Ewell, a noted Maine Two Foot fan, wrote in 2008;- “I had a chance to visit Ric’s layout before he moved and it was quite a treat to see.  He ran a long curving mainline through hilly scenery between Phillips and Rangeley.  Ric’s wife Alice built most of the buildings.”

Now let’s resume that trip and enjoy the scenery.

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SR&RL #9 on Sluice hill.

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SR&RL #10 at Madrid.

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SR&RL #10 crossing Main Street.

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SR&RL #19 on the bridge.

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SR&RL #19 and log train crossing the highway.

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SR&RL #19 and log train coming down Sluice hill.

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SR&RL #20 and train going up Sluice hill.

This picture featured as the Maine On2 Yahoo! group home page heading picture early in 2008. Chuck Collins wrote “It shows my SR&RL #20 on her way up Sluice Hill. The locomotive is a Custom Brass Import which I reworked with a new micro-motor and gearbox, detailed and painted.”

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SR&RL #22 passing the Phillips engine house.

Wes Ewell wrote “Ric’s layout was most impressive. When you lifted the roof off his Phillips engine house you found a full stable of On2 locomotives, most of them scratch built using Ric’s own etchings. I had long admired the etchings that he and his brother produced back in the 1970s, so was delighted and honored when he pointed out a Portland Forney sitting in front of his Rangeley engine house that he had built from my etchings.”

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SR&RL #24 at Phillips.

This picture featured as the Maine On2 Yahoo! group home page heading picture in mid  2008. Chuck Collins wrote “It shows SR&RL #24 after her recent arrival from Baldwin Locomotive Works, sitting in front of the depot at Phillips. The locomotive is a Custom Brass Import which was detailed and painted by my brother, Ric Collins”.

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SR&RL #24 and train going up Sluice hill.

Ric’s layout was the venue for an annual get together of West Coast Maine Two Foot fans and the last of these in 1995 was captured on home video which was posted to YouTube a couple of years ago at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDdEFAlhRng

Charlie Siebenthal wrote “I had the privilege of attending many of Ric’s annual 2-foot meets. Great layout and a rare chance to rub elbows with so many 2-footers. Bob Schlechter took up the host duties for a couple of years after Ric’s move. Last I heard Ric was into live steam garden railroading and golf.”

Here is a little digression from Maine On2 ………………….to show there is life afterwards!…………..

In the heading paragraphs, supplied by Chuck Collins, he wrote that we (he and his brother Ric) are now both involved in small scale live steam trains. Here are some pictures of Ric’s 16mm scale Mount Greta & Murieta garden line;-

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The line features in a number of YouTube videos such as the Mt Greta steamup 2016 which can be seen at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ug_rZp2Wwkc

Ric’s brother, Chuck, has more eclectic tastes in his 16mm scale modelling, choosing to follow South African (and other) Two Foot gauge prototypes with his Avontuur Light Railway shown here in this YouTube video;- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4VnUZs4n_r0

 

 

Custom Brass – SR&RL Boxcar #67 kit.

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Custom Brass announced their wooden craftsman style boxcar kit with their advertisement in the September/October 1975 edition of the NG&SL Gazette.

 

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The Custom Brass SR&RL #67 Boxcar kit was typical of what was called “a craftsman style kit”, meaning that compared to today’s (2016) kits, significant cutting, trimming and use of tools to fit details was expected.

The picture above shows the construction style well. The wooden pieces in the upper right are a milled floor (with integral side, intermediate and centre sills), the shaped sub-roof piece and two end blocks. These formed the basic body to which scribed side and end sheathing was applied, followed by plain sheeting for the roof and then strip-wood for fascia’s, ladders and roof walks.

The Custom Brass kit features a bag of black plastic details for the airbrake cylinders, other brake gear and NBW’s, and a bag of brass details for the stirrup steps, queen posts and brake wheel.

Trevor Marshall’s second S&PCRR boxcar, built from the NJ/CB kit

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In June 2007 Trevor Marshall posted the following message to the On2 Yahoo! group;-

S&PCRR doubles its boxcar fleet

Hi List:

Yes, it’s true. Until today, my On2 railroad had ONE boxcar – a Sandy River Car Shops kit built by a friend and acquired when he sold off his On2 equipment. I’ve just been too busy building flat cars for the slate quarry.

However, I decided to do something different – one can only build so many flat cars in a row, after all – so a while ago I started work on an NJ International wooden kit (acquired from another friend who was selling off his On2 equipment… hmm: I see a pattern!). The kit was for SR&RL boxcars 67-76, which were 28-foot cars. I modeled it as Somerset & Piscataquis Counties #68.

This was an interesting experience.

The kit included all the basics, but was missing information like how to route brake rods and pipes, and many details like the dozens of NBWs used on grab irons, etc. Plus, of course, a tin roof made of individual panels of thick embossing tin.

I’ve posted a few photos in the TPM-Projects folder in the photos section of the web site. Editors’ note the pictures are shown below.

It’s “finished”, although I’m waiting for some air hoses to add to the ends. The S&PCRR now has TWO boxcars!

Happy modeling…
– Trevor

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Originally posted 19-08-2016, updated 20-08-2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tin roofs and colour schemes

Tin roofs and colour schemes, edit date: 04-06-2015 Grantham 1, updated 13-11-2015.

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Key Points

As this is a long post, we present some of the key points that will be expanded further in the post;-

With only a few exceptions, all Maine Two Foot equipment; freight, passenger, and locomotives were roofed with tin sheeting. There is a misconception that canvas or tarpaper was used. Jeff Bissonnette

The exceptions are the rail autos/buses. G Kohler HOn30 response

Don’t run for the hills… the point is that the vast majority of Maine two-foot equipment had tin roofs. Some have tried to argue/”speculate”/justify whatever… that equipment had “tarpaper” or some other treatment. The bottom line is that all of the surviving equipment (that wasn’t Edavillized or covered with asphalt roofing material at Phillips) still have their original tin roofs. This is a testament to both the longevity of the material and the reason why it was chosen over other roofing materials in the first place. Chris McChesney

Standard practice was to coat the tin seamed roof with a preparation referred to as “red lead”, and this preparation was most likely mixed up on site from a paint base (boiled linseed oil?), binders and pigment (the red lead itself). Red lead is the common name for the mixed oxide of lead (Pb3O4) which in its pure state is a bright almost virulent orange colour. When mixed as a paint locally, various correspondents have indicated that colour can appear as anything from orange through to brown, and it has been described as “fugitive” ie rapidly changing. Wes Ewell, Bob Schlechter & others.

Red Lead is similar to the SR&RL “Freight Car Red” but is absolutely flat. This red is not like Floquil’s “Boxcar Red”. I use Floquil’s “Oxide Red” for roofs, sometimes cut with white for older cars. Chris McChesney

SR&RL “Freight Car Red” – This red is not like Floquil’s “Boxcar Red”, which is way too brown and is a match for D&RGW’s boxcar red. Chris McChesney
The closest out of the bottle color I have found is ATSF Mineral Brown. G Kohler 12/12/12 MaineOn2

15-12-2016: Check out David Keith’s posting “Search for SR&RL freight car red” using currently available (in the USA) paints. Click here to view on another page.

By the end of operations, the tin roofs on Maine two-foot freight cars were a dark brown rust color because… their red lead paint jobs were not maintained and the tin rusted! Chris McChesney

Roof walk boards were normally left unpainted. Painted wood and rain lead to slippery conditions. Wet, raw wood weathered with raised grain is much safer for a brakeman to walk on… especially when a train is in motion. Chris McChesney.

List of Contents

The tin roof: its use on prototype rail vehicles, structures and the tin materials.

Modelling tin roofs, a selection of modellers methods from the Yahoo! groups.

Prototype “red lead” and Maine Two Foot “boxcar red”.

What is red lead?

Modeling Red Lead

Boxcar color- Freight cars and models

Commercial paints available in the Maine Two Foot era

Prototype Paint Schemes, selection by road name and vehicle type presented on the Yahoo! groups.

The tin roof; its use on the prototype rail vehicles, structures and the tin materials.

The tin roof; its use on the prototype rail vehicles.

With only a few exceptions, all Maine Two Foot equipment; freight, passenger, and locomotives were roofed with tin sheeting. There is a misconception that canvas or tarpaper was used. Jeff Bissonnette

The exceptions are the rail autos/buses. G Kohler HOn30 response

Don’t run for the hills… the vast majority of Maine two-foot equipment had tin roofs. Some have tried to argue/”speculate”/justify whatever… that equipment had “tarpaper” or some other treatment. The bottom line is that all of the surviving equipment (that wasn’t Edavillized or covered with asphalt roofing material at Phillips) still have their original tin roofs. This is a testament to both the longevity of the material and the reason why it was chosen over other roofing materials in the first place. Chris McChesney

The pieces have a lip on one side and the top. They are nailed at the edges. The next piece is applied over the nails and then the lip of the first piece is bent over the seam, covering the nails. Finally a bead of solder is run into the seam. The porch roofs on my 1932 house are done the same way and the seams are still as tight as the seams in a tin can. Jim Pasquill.

The tin roof; its use on structures 

The metal panels were probably not pure tin, but “terne” which is tin-plated steel. When the tin plating wore off, the underlying steel would rust. See recent photos of the Strong creamery for a good example of this phenomenon. Note that the roof on that building is 97 years old and has been painted a few times. Wesley Ewell, December 2012.

Tin roofs hold up better on a building then on a car. The car begins to flex during movement as it loosens with age. This cracks the solder seals. The result is bad roof leaks — a problem we are fighting currently at the wide-gauge East Broad Top. Lee Rainey

The tin roof; the tin materials

There are three possible candidates for the tin sheet material in a historical context, tin coated steel, zinc coated steel and terne plate. Terne plate was sheet steel coated with a lead/tin mix. Modern research has shown that the lead/tin ratio varied widely, and that contemporary accounts at the time of initial building of the Maine Two Footers and their rolling stock did not distinguish between tin coated steel, zinc coated steel and terne plate. Terry Smith, December 2012.

Based on a report from Gary Kohler that the underside of a piece of boxcar roof in his collection “is as bright as the day it was made” suggests that it was made from what we would now classify as tin coated steel, as both zinc coated steel and terne plate would go dull as they aged. Terry Smith, December 2012.

Bob Troup has mentioned 30 and 32 gauge in a posting he made about tin roofs that he has seen while refurbishing cars at the SR&RL Museum. Depending upon the material and the exact gauge scale referred to (unspecified in the posts) the actual thickness of the tin sheet material could range from around .008 inches to around .013 inches. These seem low/thin to me, but an actual measurement would be valuable. Terry Smith, December 2012.

Roof walk boards were normally left unpainted. Painted wood and rain lead to slippery conditions. Wet, raw wood weathered with raised grain is much safer for a brakeman to walk on… especially when a train is in motion. Chris McChesney. However, a later posting suggests that some roof walk boards were painted – and this has been observed in some museum restorations.

Tin sheet comments from Bob Troup:

The common tin size was 14″ x 20″ with 5/16″ seams bent over, interlocked with the adjoining sheets, and soldered (flat seam soldered). As each sheet was applied it was either tacked through the seam (Laconia), or a tin strip typically 3 inches long and perhaps 1/2 inch wide hooked into the seam which was in turn tacked to the roof (Portland Co.). Roof edges were tacked to the trim or weather board every inch. On passenger cars this is not visible because a drip strip was soldered over these tacks (actually formed to a mini gutter over the platforms). Yes, all tin roofs were on a steel substrate, 30 gauge – perhaps 32. Forming compound curves on passenger car corners is a bear particularly if the steel has too much temper. You can roll the sheets to form a compound curve, then at the very corners bend a “hospital corner” just as you would on a bed sheet and hammer it until it lays down the way you want it – tack in place and solder to hide.

But, SRRL Box 155 had a mix of 14×20 and 20×28 sheets with a manufacturer’s stamp that dates to its original build date. Portland Co. ran out of one size of tin perhaps???

Laconia coaches were, and are, definitely tin. The Lower portion of roof is 14 x 20 5/8 sheets while top of clerestory is the conventional 14×20.

Historically, tin roofing was sold by the basebox = 112 sheets of 14×20 tin. For roofing tin, the plating was 4 – 5 lbs per basebox. They still talk about the plating in terms of lbs/basebox even though it is only sold on rolls now. Now it is all electroplated to about 0.25 lb/basebox which is not even close to adequate for roofing. The original process was a dipped plating and the practical dip tank held a 14×20 sheet. Galvanized material took over for roofing, but is not solderable once the zinc oxide layer forms.

All of the tin comments are based on my experiences re-roofing boxcar 155 (completed) and SRRR Coach 5 (in process), including careful measurements before I started.

Bob Troup, Secretary, SR&RL RR Museum, 2006.

SR&RL Boxcar #155 Tin roof – original and replacement at the SR&RL Museum

The following set of pictures and plans are published here courtesy of Bob Troop and Els Gray, and show the original tin roof of SR&RL boxcar #155, and its replacement at the SR&RL Museum in 2006.

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The underside of the original roof covering. Note the bright appearance (contrast to the exposed surface) and the tacks/nails protruding from the seams.

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Els Gray produced these sketches from dimensions taken by Bob Troup as an aid to modellers.

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B&SR;- My own observations (Bridgton boxcars) are that the “central” or longitudinal seam appears to be much more obvious than the crossways seams. I don’t know if this is because of different seam constructions or simply a trick of the light. Panels appear to be square, and sized 18″ x 18″. Terry Smith, February 2005.

WW&FR Boxcar Tin roofs

An off-board discussion has led me to look into the question of how boxcar tin roofs were laid, and what the pattern of seams seen should be. The revised edition of Jones and Register’s “Two Feet to Tidewater” shows a picture on page 217 of the Whitefield wreck, taken from the top of boxcar 509. The picture in the revised edition is not as clear as that shown in original copy, but shows two longitudinal seams on one roof panel (ie half the total car width) and it appears that the transverse seams are quite close together on either side of the longitudinal seams, (ie not staggered by half the panel length as is suggested by the B&SR practise). On page 368 there is a bill of materials for an order of 10 boxcars, which turn out to be the 30 foot boxcars numbered in the series 65 to 74 built by the Portland Company in 1906. The bill shows “Tin to cover 2200 sq ft of roofing. 133 sheets to one car. 112 sheets in box” Order shows 12 boxes Tin 14″ x 20″.” Doing some figuring equating the area of each sheet with the total area specified shows that the seams used 5/8″ material from each of the four sides of the piece of tin, making the laid panel clear size 12 ¾ ” x 18 ¾” separated by 5/8″ seams if single lapped. The evidence from the picture of the Whitefield wreck suggests that this car (if it used the same size tin sheet) had the sheets laid with the long dimension of the sheet laid lengthways along the car, and that the transverse seams were only a couple of inches out of line across the car. In contrast, a picture of car 502 on its side on page 45 of Kohler and McChesney “Narrow Gauge in the Sheepscot Valley” volume IV appears to show only one longitudinal seam along the lower roof half, and the individual panels appear narrower along the length of the car compared to the width (making due allowances for the relative angles), and the transverse seams appear to staggered by half a width in the two rows. This pattern could occur if the sheets are laid with the long dimension of the sheet across the car roof with the shorter dimension along the car roof. The half panel staggering is also seen in the lower picture on page 48 of the same book. Some of the pictures could be interpreted differently, and often the detail is lost in highlights etc. If anybody has other (and better) pictures and/or alternative interpretations then please post a reply. Looks like any Wiscasset modeller who wants to model tin roofs is going to have fun! Terry Smith, January, 2007.

Prototype Wiscasset tin roof panel

The following set of photographs come from Marcel Levesque and show a section of tin roofing salvaged from a farmer’s field near the Albion Station site.  Marcel writes “Stories say that two cars were brought to the field and attached together to make a livestock shed.  This section of roof material was salvaged about 10ish years ago.  It either comes from box #82 or flanger #202 which were both on site from the inventory of rolling stock taken.  It will probably answer some questions and most likely raise more……..”.

These photographs are noteworthy for showing clearly the details of the seams, the angled folded corners to each “square”, the tacks which hold the tin square down and the laying pattern of offsetting the transverse seams by half a width in the next row.

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View of the underside.

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View of the underside. Note the tacks used to attach the tin to the roof.

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View of the underside.

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View of the underside. Note the tacks used to attach the tin to the roof and the angled folded corner.

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View of the exposed top surface of the original roof.

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View of the exposed top surface of the original roof. Note how flat the seams appear.

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View of the folded seam from the top, note the tack head not quite covered by the fold.

Modelling tin roofs, a selection of modellers methods presented on the Yahoo! groups.

Gary Kohler wrote: There is an excellent article by Mark Hall on “Building Metal (Tin) Boxcar Roofs” in M2FQ Vol 3-1, 1997, and another by Gary Kohler on rusted tin roofs in M2FQ Vol 47 1995.

Jeff Bissonnette wrote:Gary Kohler came up with a good way to do this, and I modified it some to make it a little more convenient (IMO) for modelling.  Gary suggested Mylar, but I switched to Evergreen 0.005″ thick styrene sheet. What to do is simple. I laid out the 18″ and 27″ divisions on the styrene using a soft pencil. Then place the sheet of styrene over a sheet of basswood. Using some sort of ball ended scriber (ball point pen, or a rounded off scriber), “draw” the panels into the styrene using light pressure. The basswood sheet underneath supports the material, but still allows the scriber to force a fine line into the styrene. The last step is to heavily scribe the roof peak into the sheet so that the “tin roof” can be bent to match the pitch of the car roof. Use ACC or epoxy to glue to the car roof, and once dry, trim off the excess. This technique works well for HOn2/n30, but looks especially good for Sn2 cars. If you’re not crazy about using styrene, craft stores carry small rolls of 0.002″ thick copper sheets that would work just as well, maybe better. The problem with aluminium foil is that it is so thin and is easily torn or distorted. Another method is to scribe the panel pattern onto an existing resin or styrene car roof, then apply aluminium tape (used for duct work) over the entire surface. Burnish with a soft stick or “Q”-tip and it gives a really nice effect. You can even carefully trim the material so it can be bent over the edges, just like the prototype cars. A recent communication from a museum (think it was Sandy River) had a report that the superintendent had ordered tin sheets 18″ x 27″ to re-roof something. M2FM had an article years ago that said that they were roughly 18″ x 27″ panels. Though some Maine Two-Foot cars had smaller panels as well. It depends on the car and even the era modelled for any one car.

In 2006, there was a flurry of postings on the Maine On2 Yahoo! group which reported what various modellers were doing or suggestions to use for representing metal seamed roofs;-

Bill Kerr: I do not use foil. I build in styrene, so I use .010” x .020” styrene strips to simulate the seams. After gluing down, I sand the strips down to almost nothing.

Elliott Thomas suggested: Try the silver tape used in ductwork (not duct tape!) It is thin, and goes on easily. It will take paint and is available at many larger hardware stores.

Doug Rowe added: I have read that some folks use the aluminium tape that air conditioning & furnace repairmen use to seal ducts- not “Duct Tape.” This stuff is like aluminium foil with a sticky back, and comes in rolls.

Keith Gutshall: I use the foil disposable cookware from the supermarket. The foil is thicker than the rolls and tools very good. The cookie sheet yields the most flat stuff to work with. Goo or a similar contact glue would work best, because a flexible glue seems to work best with the metal and the wood.

Terry Smith: I use two methods, either a styrene roof panel and then add chart tape for seams, and use paint applied by brush to soften the hard edge and as extra “glue” or I have used the same panel as a master, adding the roof walk supports, and then casting urethane complete roof sections using an RTV silicone rubber mould. I have heard of using paint or varnish as a fixative for metal foils in plastic kit building.

The picture below shows the taped seam roof on the right (and historically incorrect representation of tarpaper roofs central and left).

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In June 2007 Trevor Marshall wrote about using “embossing foils”, which he then cut into individual pieces and glued to the sub-roof to produce overlapping seams,  shown  below.

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Shortly afterwards Terry Smith used the same materials, (ArtEmboss by Amaco, in particular #50068T; light aluminium) to produce an embossed half roof panel which he then copied in urethane resin using RTV Silicone Rubber moulds for his own 26 foot B&SR boxcars. The two pictures below show one of these roofs under directional lighting (both from the right) in order to show how the lighting emphasises the seams along and across the roof differently.

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In 2010/2012 John Rogers wrote: I use stained glass copper foil with an adhesive backing in the 3/8” width size, cut to length. It works great. Apply it to wood that has been sealed with two coats of clear brushing lacquer and it will adhere very well. After it is on, I put a coat of brushing lacquer over the copper to help keep it from peeling up at the edges. A picture showing this technique on a caboose roof is shown below.

 

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In early 2013 Terry Smith posted a summary of his foil roof experience to the Maine On2 group after a number of offboard questions;-

When I first started out on my Maine On2 modelling journey around 1990, I tried using domestic aluminium cooking foil to represent metal roofs, as suggested by Peter Barney in his SRCS kits, but I could not get it to work for me. I found it way too fragile and too prone to unintended embossings and it also shows glue thickness variations. Standard UK domestic aluminium cooking foil is only 0.015mm/.0006” thick, which is too thin for this type of application. That’s when I started to use a replacement styrene roof panel plus self adhesive chart tape to represent the seams. The tape is Letraline by Letraset and the writing on the cassette is 3005 .5mm black flex 3112. I bought mine 20+ years ago and I’m not sure if it’s still made or available.

Then sometime after I joined this group (Maine On2 Yahoo! group), way back in the 2002/03 period, Bill Kerr published a picture of a SR&RL metal roof from Jeff Bissonette (the heading photo of this posting) which opened my eyes to just how subtle the seams needed to be, and then sometime around the 2006/07 timeframe, Trevor Marshall mentioned the Amaco ArtEmboss materials.

I have trialled a number of the Amaco metals and thicknesses;-

50063M; medium pewter, 0.17mm/.007” thick, weighs 122 grams per 9¼” x 12” sheet.

50067S; medium aluminium, 0.17mm/.007” thick, weighs 26 grams per 9¼” x 12” sheet.

50068T; light aluminium, 0.09mm/.0035” thick, estimated weight 13 grams per 9¼” x 12” sheet.

Pewter is really nice for its finish and ease of embossing, but I found it rather heavy and floppy to use for a single/one half roof panel. It’s great as a replacement for the soft metal foil that I used to get from Drambuie bottle tops which I used in the past for representing lead roof flashings on roofs.

Although I really like the way the pewter foil embosses and takes impressions, I find the easiest material to work with is the thin aluminium sheet. This is lighter and stiffer and so I can work with pieces that are one piece for boxcar roofs.

I also find it simpler to make a master of the embossed foil (glue it down to a piece of styrene) in order to make a mould because then the resultant urethane part has permanent ridges which are pretty obviously immune to handling damage in a way that the embossed foil itself is not (and of course further copies can be made easily).

The picture below shows the urethane roof that Terry has recently made for a Wiscasset 65-74 series boxcar, with the long edge of the tin “squares” across the roof.

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My piece of the thicker aluminium foil (Amaco medium) is pretty much intact, nearly a full sheet, so obviously I have not used it much. I think that I found it too thick for my embossing style and procedures, in comparison to the light aluminium, and perhaps too stiff as a sheet to ensure that it laid flat over a styrene sheet as a master pattern.

The Amaco aluminium foils have a matt, almost brushed surface finish both sides. The pewter has an almost polished finished, but it is not a mirror finish.

I also bought some copper foil/shim 0.09mm/.0035” thick from a different source and found that it was also a usable material for embossing, impressions and handling but was much more difficult to trim, especially at the edges, with a modelling knife and therefore lost out to light aluminium and pewter. It was also more difficult to remove mistakes and unintended embossings from this material than light aluminium and pewter.

None of the metal foils have shown glue lines when using a medium thickness ACC (Green label, Zap-a-Gap Medium CA+ by Pacer) to glue them down over styrene.

Prototype “red lead” and Maine Two Foot “boxcar red”.

What is red lead?

A number of correspondents (including Wes Ewell and Robert Schlechter) have confirmed that standard practice was to coat the tin seamed roof with a preparation referred to as “red lead”, and indicated that this preparation was more than likely to have been mixed up on site from a paint base (boiled linseed oil?), binders and pigment (the red lead itself). Red lead is the common name for the mixed oxide of lead (Pb3O4)which in its pure state is a bright almost virulent orange colour. When mixed as a paint locally, the correspondents have indicated that colour can appear as anything from orange through to brown, and it has been described as “fugitive” ie rapidly changing.

By the end of operations, the tin roofs on Maine two-foot freight cars were a dark brown rust color because… their red paint jobs were not maintained and the tin rusted! This is abundantly evident in the Bridgton & Harrison DVD available from Gary Kohler. There are a couple of shots taken from the roofs of boxcars that will provide perfect color tone and weathering information. Chris McChesney

Question – what color for red lead?

Answer 1: I am a scenic painter in the theater and majored in historic paint formulas of the early period of electric light. Red lead is a color that is all over the board. It ranges from flame oranges to brown. The color was made by a couple of different methods each resulting in a vast array of hues. Add to this variation that red lead (also known as minium) was harshly affected by acrid coal smoke it is almost impossible to speculate on a correct red. UV rays seriously affected the color as it aged and a painted piece could have many variations of the same pot color. Add again the fact that lead and tin may have been mismatched as finish coat and substrate a wide variety of colors could appear.

What am I really saying? Red lead was not a set formula but a purpose made color which changed from pot to pot and from day to day in use. Variations in modeling will present the railroad in everyday use. Unless we all agree to model a specific moment in time we can all have red roofs that are “correct”.

If some one has a sample, a very close color match could be calculated and we could discuss it using a Munsell number, giving us all access to viewing a matched sample then choosing our own shade of red. Brian Goodman

Answer 2: As far as “What is true “Red Lead?” that’s like asking to correctly identify/match “Barn red”. The best you can do is compare what few color photos we have to black and white images and try to draw some logical conclusions. Gary Kohler and I have been collecting samples and analyzing Maine 2-foot colors (and trying to match them in our models) for years. If you really want to see and judge colors for yourself, buy one of Gary’s color CD’s. My favorite is the “Bridgton & Harrison Ry. Video and Photos from 1939-1941.” In a previous post someone erroneously used the word “colorized” to describe the images. Make no mistake, the color in this DVD not colorized like a painted postcard. The color is from real color slides taken by a railfan in the early ’40s. Gary purchased the original slides from a friend of the deceased photographer. The B&H slides are the best color Maine two-foot images we have ever seen. Period. There is no “shifting” or contrast that occurs with copy slides. These aren’t copy slides and Gary hasn’t run them through Photoshop or anything goofy like that (the naysayers need to give it a rest). So, If you want to see the wide range of reds you described (and excellent examples of weathering)… heck if you want to see the best real 2-foot color period, get a copy. No one will have to speculate about UV, coal acridity, chemical reactions with the tin substrate etc. etc. anymore. Chris McChesney

Answer 3: If you review your Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes RR Museum newsletters you will find a series of articles about the stripping of the Sandy River/SR&RL Laconia passenger car in preparation for restoration. In the article, it states that the ORIGINAL color of the paint applied to the TIN roof of the coach was found! It survived because it was in a protected location. The article states that this color is best matched to “Red Lead”. Red Lead is similar to the SR&RL “Freight Car Red” but is absolutely flat. This red is not like Floquil’s “Boxcar Red”. Floquil’s boxcar red is way too brown and is a match for D&RGW’s boxcar red. I use Floquil’s “Oxide Red” (sometimes cut with white for older cars) for roofs. Also in the Sandy River Railroad Museum article, they found an area of the coach that had ORIGINAL green paint on it. The area is the wood found directly behind the brass bell cord sleeves found at the end of the cars above the doors. This color was the color applied at the Laconia car works. The brass bell cord sleeve was applied later. The article states that the original color is indeed best matched to Floquil’s “Brunswick Green”. Chris McChesney

Answer 4: Two-foot coaches, in general, were maintained better and the Red Lead is visible in many SR&RL and B&H coach shots even immediately after abandonment (including the earliest Kodachrome postcards series of the Edaville fleet). If you own one of these postcards of the Rangeley, you will notice that the car sides have been restored and repainted but the Red Lead on the tin roof was left alone. There are dents and areas of bare metal seen in many places on this ORIGINAL roof. Later, this roof was painted by Edaville in I believe black. Chris McChesney

Modeling Red Lead

Red Lead is similar to the SR&RL “Freight Car Red” but is absolutely flat. I use Floquil’s “Oxide Red” (sometimes cut with white for older cars) for roofs. Chris McChesney

I use oxide red with some caboose red mixed in. The red lead that I used to paint my rowboats with when I was a kid was more of a Chinese red, but varied a lot depending upon how thoroughly you stirred it. Wes Ewell

Boxcar color- Freight cars and models

The SR&RL requisition sheets state, “Freight Car Red”. Nothing is more accurate than the real thing and since I’ve found a good piece of existing paint, un-weathered, I have been able to come up with a formula that I feel, as well as others who have seen it, is 98% accurate.

You will need the following paints: Floquil Polly S Metal Primer, Floquil Polly S Roof Red and Model Masters (Acrylic Enamel) Desert Sand. The formula is as follows: Three parts Metal Primer, two parts Roof Red and a touch of Desert Sand. This will get you an almost perfect colour match. For a slightly weathered colour, add a touch of Model Masters Flat White.

SR&RL freight cars were lettered with White Lead. excerpt from Brian Carters page information provided by Gary Kohler, take link for more details.

The SR&RL “Freight Car Red” color is similar to Red Lead, and not like Floquil’s “Boxcar Red”. Floquil’s boxcar red is matched to D&RGW’s boxcar red and is way too brown for a Maine Two Foot freight car  – edited from Chris McChesney

The closest out of the bottle color I have found is ATSF Mineral Brown. G Kohler 12/12/12 MaineOn2

15-12-2016: Check out David Keith’s posting “Search for SR&RL freight car red” using currently available (in the USA) paints. Click here to view on another page.

Commercial paints available in the Maine Two Foot era

Bob Schlechter has sent some useful background information: most paint colors prior to 1940’s were not available ready mixed off the shelf as they are today. My grandfather and father were painters by profession and they had to make up colors by adding tinting colors from a tube of concentrate color. It was a very difficult task to match colors exactly unless one was a very good professional. This accounts for the many variations that resulted.

White lead, linseed oil and turpentine were the starting point of any color for painting wood. Red lead was the starting point for painting metals.

Time and weathering can also account for the variations in shades as not all equipment was painted at the same time.

Prototype Paint Schemes, selection by road name and vehicle type as presented on the Yahoo! groups.

SR&RL Selected Rolling Stock

Cream/Dairy car information – Freight

SRRR #19 was lettered CREAM CAR. The only photos I have (or have seen) of #21 show it numbered only #21 on each side of door. No cream car, no dairy car, no milk car, no dairy/milk ice cream car.

Numbers 19 and 21 had full length door stops to allow running with doors open. It is not clear if 19 had an end door, but many early cars did. Number 21 became SR&RL 59 and still exists today. Number 21 had ladders on sides — for some reason. HOWEVER, it did retain this feature on the SR&RL (as number 59) until the early 1920s. This was later changes to conform to standard SR&RL practice.

What is unique about 21/59 is that it had ladders and roof platforms on both ends of the car sides. However, the later photos showing this car 21 numbered as 59 indicate that the extra ladders and roof platforms were removed at some point so it looks like any other boxcar. Jim red_gate_rover

SR&RL #145 was lettered DAIRY PRODUCTS centered top/bottom, left/right to the right of the door. Number 145 did not have an end door. All cars had standard boxcar doors, no ice hatches, roof ventilators, chimneys, etc. Gary Kohler response on HOn30 group

SR&RL 17 & 18 ex SRRR 5 & 6

A Sandy River Railroad Museum article state they found an area of the coach that had ORIGINAL green paint on it. The area is the wood found directly behind the brass bell cord sleeves found at the end of the cars above the doors. This color was the color applied at the Laconia car works. The brass bell cord sleeve was applied later. The article states that the original color is indeed best matched to Floquil’s “Brunswick Green.” Chris McChesney

Non-revenue Equipment

Caboose – Non-revenue equipment

Cabooses had tin roofs.

The SR&RL, as well as all Maine 2-foot roads, used tin for roof coverings. Caboose 556 (Phillips, ME) still has its original tin roof. The roofs were all painted red lead. Tarpaper would not stand up in the severe Maine winters. Gary Kohler

Cabooses had red trucks.

Underbodies WERE NOT painted. Metal parts may have been, but I have not found proof. It appears that trucks were painted red when new. Gary Kohler

Internal green color

A very good approximation of the light green used inside engine cabs and cabooses on the Maine two-footers is Polly Scale No. 505254 Br. Sky (Type S). Wesley J. Ewell

B&SR/B&H Selected Rolling Stock

B&SR tank car color. – Freight

Editors note 04-06-2015; there is currently an unfinished conversation on the Maine On2 Yahoo! group on this subject, the results of which will be added at some time in the future.

The B&SR tank cars were never painted black! The earliest known photo (1905) clearly shows gray or silver tank on a standard flat car (the B&SR used Princes Brown (Red Oxide my guess)). All later photos, including about a half a dozen color images clearly show silver/gray tanks with the SOCONY in black. The Moody photo in question that has caused everyone to jump on the “black” band wagon was taken in shadow and appears black due to all the rust! Color photos taken the same year show silver/gray tanks. Gary Kohler.

This article is being discounted as erroneous about the black tank color? Narrow Gauge & Short Line Gazette Sept/Oct 1979 Peter Barney did an article on Painting Two-Foot Gauge Cars. One interesting point Barney says B&H tank Cars were “Tank” Flat car box red with natural wood decking. Tank “At first painted black with white lettering, and white ends with black lettering. Later tanks were off-white to gray with black lettering. By the end of the railroad the tanks had no lettering.” Walter Orloff

It is as with most things, publish, and new information may come to light contradicting your conclusions of your research. The listing is not meant as negative reflection on the great work Peter has done for the Maine Two Footers.

Bob Schlechter on Bridgton Tank Car Colours:  I studied the potential colors of the B&SR RR tank cars #21 and 22. In later years they were likely repainted silver/aluminium or black (Edaville) as some date. Early photos in their prime is not silver but likely the Standard Oil light warm gray.

See photo bottom of page 234 in Jones’ “Two Feet to the Lakes”. Those tank cars are not silver or black and lettering isn’t black either but likely Standard Oil’s blue. The date of the photo’s is around 1920 or 21, shortly after tank #22 arrived on the scene.

Wes Ewell on B&H rail car colours; I picked up a color print of the B&H railbus 3 at one of the West Springfield shows and was surprised to see how it was
painted. I always assumed it was green with a red lead roof and black hood. In this photo the hood, frame and trucks are freshly painted gloss black; the body is faded boxcar red and the roof appears to be silver or aluminium paint.

Wes Ewell on B&SR Loco  colours;

Question, did any B&SR Forneys come with a gray (Russian Iron) boiler and/or varnished wood cab?

I believe the B&SR engines Hinckleys 1 & 2, Portlands 3 & 5 and Baldwin 6 were all delivered with russian iron boiler jackets and painted cabs.  – Wes Ewell

W&Q/WW&FR Selected Rolling Stock

trrc01

Rod Coombs supplied this picture of a GME WW&FR #6 to show the Brunswick Green colour used on many Maine Two Foot passenger cars.

WW&F #6 Baggage/Mail/Smoker painting

Question: Anyone have the best color to paint this car circa 1915? The best I can find is coach green (any idea on that color) to freight car red. Also what color is chrome yellow? Thanks, Paul Buhrke

Answer: This is an interesting question and I’ve thought about the answer for some time, too… But seriously: Unfortunately, I haven’t yet seen a photo of this car from that era. Apparently the noted 2-ft.-authorities also don’t have one either. The following notes come right out of memory as my 2-ft.-stuff is already packed for an upcoming move.

What I have is a contact print from the original glass plate taken at the J&S plant. On this one, the car seems to be very dark. I believe this color was called pullman green. I think somebody (Gary K.?) once described it as a mix between dark green and black. Of course the fancy original lettering was there.

After Carson Peck bought the WW&F in 1906, it has been written that the passenger cars received a fresh coat of green paint. Once again, I haven’t seen any photos of the combine from that time, but there is one of matching coach “Vassalboro” (originally #5), showing it lettered as “WW&F _RY_” and numbered as “12”, thus dating the photo post-1906/7. In this photo, the coach body is painted in a lighter color. This can’t be a negative or print deterioration, as the image also shows an engine tank, and this one is clearly painted in a very dark (probably black) color. The roof color can’t be determined easily, but is very light. Contrary to the original appearance (where the clerestory window area was painted dark), roof and clerestory window area are painted the same color (!). It seems to be much lighter than the roof red found on the coach at the WW&F Museum (although I don’t know how close this is towards the original color). Therefore, I seriously believe the roof area might have been painted silver or aluminum… I think the photos showing the Peck inspection train (taken around 1907?) support this.

The described photo (I think it has at least been published in Peter Barney’s WW&F volume) may also fit in your timeframe because the eastern (riverside) stall of the Wiscasset engine house had already received its rear doors (they weren’t in place when the building was built around 1906).

The statements of this car being painted (some sort of) yellow or freight car red belong IMO to later eras: When a group of railfans visited Albion around 1930 (photos are in the Sirman collection), #6 was painted in a noticeable lighter color than following passenger/RPO-combine 7. It seems to be a bit too light for being freight car red. This leads me to the conclusion that at that time #6 was just primed and put back into service. Compared to primer colors here in Germany, this could explain the yellow.

Towards the end of operations, #6 seems to have received a fresh coat of freight car red paint. There is a color slide of the overturned car bodies in Wiscasset’s upper yard showing this clearly. Of course, I’m always interested in discussing other opinions. Wolf-Jobst Siedler

WW&FR Freight car lettering stencil

George Dutka has posted a picture showing a prototype WW&FR lettering stencil on his Modeling Maine in Narrow Gauge blog. Click here to view on another page.

 

 

 

Prototype Information: the SR&RL locomotives

tssrlo01

The well travelled Portland locomotive, builders number 622, which served as Sandy River #5, Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #6, Kennebec Central  #4 and Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington #9, before being moved to Connecticut for more that 50 years. Shown here on it’s return to Maine at the WW&F Museum.

The following notes on individual locomotives were originally compiled (except where otherwise noted) and published by Chuck Collins, and are re-published here with his permission. The introduction, updates and formatting for this blog by Terry Smith. Updated 15-01-2015 and 03-03-2015.

The Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad 

The Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad was formed in January 1908 when the two major groups of shareholders owning the SR and F&M (one group) and the P&R, Madrid and Eustis (second group) agreed to merge. The locomotive and rolling stock fleets were merged and renumbered. The new company operated profitably and paid regular share and bond dividends.

In 1911 the SR&RL was acquired by the Maine Central Railroad on the direction of its parent company, the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad.

Under Maine Central control a number of older locomotives were scrapped or taken out of service and larger replacements were ordered from manufacturers. Track was upgraded, and starting 1915 the MeC rebuilt a number of the SR&RL loco’s with bigger boilers, etc, including enlarging a number of (2-6-0) Mogul types into larger (2-6-2) Prairies.

Further locomotive fleet improvements came later with the installation of air brakes and electric headlights.

In 1923 the SR&RL defaulted on some bonds and was then put into receivership. The court appointed former owners/shareholders Josiah Maxcy and Herbert Wing as receiver, and then the SR&RL took a long time dying, too long to tell here.

Finally after a number of cut backs, closures and re-starts Maxcy and Wing petitioned for closure and dispersal of assets in the Spring of 1935. This was granted and the final narrow gauge rail was removed from Farmington in late 1936.

SR&RL #1

Hinkley #1251 built 1877 as Billerica & Bedford Ariel.

12 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
30″ diameter 130psi boiler
8″x12″ cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank carried 400 gallons water and 1/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Billerica & Bedford #1 Ariel (1878 – 1879) as a strict cab forward Forney design.

Sandy River #1 Dawn (1879 – 1890) rebuilt as a conventional boiler first locomotive.

Rebuilt in 1882 with longer wheelbase, larger cab and water tank.

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #1 (1908 – 1912)

This was the first two foot gauge engine built for New England, and was virtually identical to Billerica and Bedford Puck built shortly thereafter. Built to run tank first. Purchased by Sandy River Railroad following dismantling of Billerica and Bedford Railroad. Rebuilt by the Hinkley Works in Boston in April 1879 as Sandy River Dawn #1 running boiler first and using wood fuel. Used as Sandy River Railroad construction engine beginning October 1879. Wrecked on plow train at Sandy River bridge south of Phillips 23 January 1882. Rebuilt March 1882 with longer wheelbase, larger cab, and tank capacity increased to 500 gallons. Became the preferred Sandy River engine following rebuilding. Used for passenger service following delivery of Sandy River #4 in October 1890. Reconverted to coal burning in 1893. Used as a standby engine following purchase of Sandy River 2nd #2 in 1893. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #1 in 1908 consolidation. Little used following purchase of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #9 in 1909. Scrapped September 1912 as Maine Central Railroad modernized subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes locomotive fleet.

Editors note: 20-05-2017: the statements in italics need checking, as they appear incorrect by later photographs.

SR&RL #2

Hinkley #1664 built 1/1884 as Franklin & Megantic #1 V.B.Mead.

14 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
32″130psi boiler
9×12 cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank held 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton wood.

This locomotive served as

Franklin & Megantic #1 (1884 – 1905)

Franklin & Megantic #2(2nd) (1905 -1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #2 (1908 – 1912)

This locomotive followed the pattern of Monson #1. Used as Franklin & Megantic construction engine beginning October 1884, and for Franklin & Megantic passenger service beginning 10 December 1884. Used as a standby engine following delivery of the former Laurel River & Hot Springs mogul in 1900. Renumbered Franklin & Megantic #2 in June 1905. Little used following purchase of Sandy River #16 in 1907. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #2 in the 1908 consolidation. Scrapped September 1912 as Maine Central Railroad modernized subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes locomotive fleet.

SR&RL #3

Baldwin #8304 built 12/1886 as Franklin & Megantic #2 S.W.Sargent.

16 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
38″ diameter 130psi boiler
9″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank held 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton wood.

This locomotive served as

Franklin & Megantic #2 (1st) (1886 – 1905)

Franklin & Megantic #3 (1905 -1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #3 (1908 – 1912)

This was the first Baldwin locomotive built for the Maine 2 foot gauge lines, and was the first to use the outside frames favored by Baldwin. It was the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine at the time of its delivery. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 5 tons per axle was a half ton greater than Hinkley’s Franklin & Megantic #1. Purchased as a freight engine to carry lumber produced by mills on the recently completed Mount Abram branch. Used as a standby engine following Josiah Maxcy’s purchase of the Franklin & Megantic railroad in 1898. Renumbered Franklin & Megantic #3 in June 1905. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #2 in the 1908 consolidation. Unused following completion of logging operations at Hammond Field. Scrapped September 1912 as Maine Central Railroad modernized subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes locomotive fleet.

SR&RL #4

Hinkley #1261 built 1877 as Billerica & Bedford Puck.

12 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
30″ diameter 130psi boiler
8″x12″ cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank carried 400 gallons water and 1/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Billerica & Bedford #2 Puck (1878 – 1879) as a strict cab forward Forney design.

Sandy River #2 Echo (1879 – 1890) rebuilt as a conventional boiler first locomotive.

Phillips & Rangeley #2 Bo Peep (1890 – 1893)

Phillips & Rangeley #4 Bo Peep (1893 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #4 (1908 – 1912)

This locomotive was a reorder of the Billerica and Bedford Ariel design to be used as a standby engine. Built to run tank first. Purchased by Sandy River Railroad following dismantling of Billerica and Bedford Railroad. Rebuilt by the Hinkley Works in Boston inApril 1879 as Sandy River Echo #2 running boiler first and using wood fuel. Used as Sandy River construction engine beginning 25 September 1879. Pulled the first passenger train to Strong 12 November 1879. Sold to Phillips and Rangeley Railroad as P&R #2 Bo Peep in July 1890 and used as Phillips and Rangeley construction engine. Renumbered Phillips & Rangeley #4 and used as a standby engine following purchase of Phillips & Rangeley 2nd #2 in 1893. Used for summer only passenger service between Rangeley and Green Farm upon completion of the Eustis Railroad in 1904. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #4 in 1908, but little used following discontinuance of Eustis branch passenger service in same year. Scrapped September 1912 as Maine Central Railroad modernized subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes locomotive fleet.

SR&RL #5

Portland #616 built 10/1890 as Sandy River #4.

18 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
34″ diameter 140psi boiler
10.5″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank carried 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #4 (1890 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #5 (1908 – 1919).

This engine was built in a joint order with Phillips and Rangeley #1. The two engines reflected Portland Company’s initial modification of the Hinkley design. This engine was ordered to replace Sandy River #2 when that engine was sold to the Phillips and Rangeley. Used as the Sandy River freight engine until Sandy River #5 was delivered in May 1891. Then assigned to passenger service including the Rangeley Express. Burned in Phillips 19 June 1897 engine house fire. Derailed by ice and overturned on a Phillips & Rangeley plow train between Dallas and Dead River Station on 21 January 1903 with Dana Aldrich as engineer. Derailed by excessive speed and rolled over with the southbound Rangeley Express north of Strong on 8 September 1906. Used as a standby passenger engine following delivery of Sandy River #16 in 1907. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #5 in 1908 consolidation. Derailed and rolled over with passenger train near Carrabasset 26 October 1913. Little used following purchase of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #10 in 1916. Scrapped when Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #24 was delivered in 1919.

SR&RL #6

Portland #622 built 5/1891 as Sandy River #5 N. B. Beal.

18 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
34″ diameter 140psi boiler
10.5″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank carried 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #5 (1890 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #6 (1908 – 1925).

Kennebec Central as KC #4 (1908 – 1925).

Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington #9 (1908 – 1925).

Currently at the WW&F Museum.

This engine was a repeat order for the design of Sandy River #4. Purchased to handle lumber traffic being produced by mills on the newly completed Phillips and Rangeley Railroad. Used as the Sandy River freight engine until Sandy River 2nd #2 was delivered in September 1893. Overturned at Strong in December 1892, and repaired with a new cab January 1893. Burned in Phillips 19 June 1897 engine house fire. Engineer Will Barker was killed when this engine was hit and overturned by a standard gauge engine at the Farmington diamond on 20 December 1897. Used as the Franklin & Megantic freight engine from completion of repairs in February 1898 until the former Laurel River & Hot Springs mogul was purchased in February, 1900. Then used as the Franklin and Megantic passenger engine. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #6 in 1908. Overturned with passenger train south of Salem Summit 23 January 1917. Electric headlight installed 13 December 1921. Sold to the Kennebec Central as KC #4 in 1925 and used as their standby engine until discontinuance of service in 1929. Purchased by Frank Winter and moved to Wiscasset in 1932. Renumbered Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington #9 and used as the standby engine until discontinuance of service on the Wiscasset, Waterville and Farmington in 1933. Purchased by a railfan and moved to Connecticut in 1937.

SR&RL #7

Portland #615 built 10/1890 as Phillips and Rangeley #1 Calvin Putnam.

18 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
34″ diameter 140psi boiler
10.5″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank held 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #1 (1890 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #7 (1908 – 1935)

This engine was built in a joint order with Sandy River #4. The two engines reflected Portland Company’s execution of the pattern purchased from the defunct Hinkley Locomotive Works. This locomotive was 20% heavier than the engines Hinkley had built for the Bridgton & Saco River, Franklin & Megantic, and Monson railroads. It was the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine at the time of its delivery. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 5.5 tons per axle was a full ton greater than the Hinkley design. This Portland design proved to be the most successful and enduring for the Maine 2 foot gauge railroads. Forty years later, locomotives of this design pulled the final trains on the Kennebec Central, Monson, and Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington railroads. This engine was assigned to Phillips & Rangeley passenger service including through trains over the Sandy River during summer months. The original Portland cab was damaged in 1904 and replaced by a less ornate Baldwin style cab. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #7 in 1908 and used as a standby passenger engine following delivery of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #9 in 1909. Derailed at a washout between Kingfield and Salem on 15 April 1912. Rolled over with passenger train during low speed collision with another train at Strong on 8 July 1916. Little used following purchase of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #24 in 1919. Stored outdoors in 1923 and scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

SR&RL #8

Baldwin #31826 built 9/1907 as Sandy River #16.

Configuration:
28 ton inside frame 2-4-4RT
41″ diameter 180psi boiler
11.5″x14″ cylinders
35″ drivers
Rear tank carried 800 gallons water & 1.5 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #16 (1907 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #8 (1908 – 1935).

This was one of a pair of engines built to Bridgton master mechanic Mel Caswell’s specification for inside frames. The other was Bridgton and Saco River #6. These were the largest Maine 2 foot gauge engines built with inside frames, and the only inside frame engines Baldwin built for the Maine 2 foot gauge railroads. Sandy River’s next order to Baldwin, after a year of experience with this engine, was for an identical engine with outside frames. Purchased to replace the Portland Forneys with more power for the Rangeley Express. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #8 in 1908. Engineer Frank Hodgman was killed when this engine left the rails and tipped over at Fairbanks while pulling the 11 August 1917 Rangeley Express northbound. Used as a standby engine for low speed work following that wreck. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Burned in the 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. Not repaired and scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

SR&RL #9

Baldwin #33550 built 7/1909 as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #9.

Configuration: 28 ton outside frame 2-4-4RT
41″ diameter 180psi boiler
11.5″x14″ cylinders
35″ drivers
Rear tank carried 800 gallons water & 1.2 tons coal.

This locomotive served as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #9 (1909 – 1936).
This engine repeated the design of Sandy River #16 but specified outside frames following experience with the instability of the earlier engine. Purchased to replace the Portland Forneys with more power for the Rangeley Express and became the preferred passenger engine. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Fitted with air brakes in1920. Used in mixed train service during receivership. Was the standby engine during dismantling of the Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad, and was scrapped at Farmington in 1936.

SR&RL #10

Baldwin #44231 built 10/1916 as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #10.

33 ton outside frame 2-4-4RT
43″ diameter 180psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
36″ drivers
Rear tank carried 1000 gallons water & 1.5 tons coal.

This locomotive served as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #10 (1916 – 1936).

This engine was a repetition of Bridgton master mechanic Mel Caswell’s Bridgton & Saco River #7 design to test applicability of Bridgton & Saco River railroad experience to conditions on the Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad. This was the heaviest engine to operate on the Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad. Weight was destructive on the 35 pound rails north of Phillips and contributed to subsequent abandonment of service over the former Phillips & Rangeley. Never used on the former Franklin & Megantic line to Kingfield or Carrabasset. Burned in the 3 October 1917 Rangeley engine house fire. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Became the preferred engine for mixed trains on the heavy rail main line from Phillips to Farmington until service was discontinued in 1935. Derailed 5 miles north of Farmington on 26 December 1929 in the last wreck on the Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad. Scrapped in 1936.

SR&RL #15

Baldwin #11706 built 3/1891 as Phillips & Rangeley #3 George M. Goodwin.

Configuration: 23 ton outside frame 2-6-0
42″ diameter 130psi boiler
13″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
15 ton tender held 1200 gallons water & 2 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #3 (1891 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #15 (1908 – 1935)

Rebuilt as a Prairie locomotive in 1912.

Phillips & Rangeley Railroad had again taken delivery of the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 6.3 tons per axle was 20% greater than Portland’s Phillips & Rangeley #1. The engine alone was 30% heavier than Phillips & Rangeley #1 and it was the first locomotive with a separate tender on the Maine two foot gauge railroads. Observation of its performance provided basis for the improved design later built for Laurel River & Hot Springs. Purchased to handle lumber traffic produced by the Redington sawmill. Used as the preferred Phillips & Rangeley freight engine. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #15 in 1908. Rebuilt in 1912 by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops as a 25 ton 2-6-2 with a 42″ diameter 180 PSI boiler, 12.5×16 inch cylinders, and a 19 ton tender. This was the first engine rebuilt by Maine Central, and results were observed and applied to future Mogul conversions. Boiler steam capacity was still inadequate for 12.5″ diameter cylinders. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Used in general freight service until it broke a driver axle 12 February 1923. Never repaired. Scrapped in 1935

SR&RL #16

Baldwin #12964 built 10/1892 as Laurel River & Hot Springs James Wyman.

20 ton outside frame 2-6-0
38″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
13 ton tender carried 700 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Laurel River & Hot Springs James Wyman (1892)

Sandy River #3 (2nd) (1900 – 1905).

Sandy River #6 (1905 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #16 (1908 – 1936)

Substantially rebuilt as a Prairie locomotive in 1915.

This improved Mogul design was based on observation of Phillips & Rangeley #3. The North Carolina lumber operation for which it was built failed within a few months, and the engine was brought to Wiscasset on 20 January 1897. The engine was put in storage in Portland when the Wiscasset & Quebec Railroad was unable to pay for it. Built with air brakes and became the first Maine 2 foot gauge engine so equipped. Delivered to the Sandy River railroad in February 1900. Renumbered Sandy River 2nd #3 and became the preferred freight engine on Sandy River subsidiary Franklin & Megantic Railroad. Overturned in switching test by Orris Vose at Salem Summit on 29 October 1900. Derailed on a plow train at Salem Flat on 8 February 1901. Renumbered Sandy River #6 in June 1905. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #16 in 1908. Rebuilt October 1915 by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops adding a trailing truck to support a larger boiler, and a proportionally larger tender was provided similar to the original design of Sandy River #8. Subsequently used system wide in freight and mixed service. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Burned in 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. After completion of repairs rolled over during low speed collision with Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #23 at Phillips in 1924. Unused after 1932. Scrapped during dismantling of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad in 1935.

SR&RL #17

Baldwin #13276 built 3/1893 as Phillips & Rangeley second #2.

Configuration: 26 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
38″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
35″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #2 (2nd) (1893 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #17 (1908 – 1936)

For the third time in as many purchases, Phillips & Rangeley Railroad ordered what became the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 9 tons per axle was twice the loading of the Hinkley engines and almost 50% greater than Phillips & Rangeley #3. This engine similarly doubled the weight of the Hinkley design. Pulling power was similar to Phillips & Rangeley #3 mogul, but the absence of a separate tender made backing easier where no turntable was available. Sloshing water in partially filled leading tenders was subsequently blamed for several derailments on the rough track of logging branches. Phillips & Rangeley #2 proved well suited to branch line logging operations. Phillips & Rangeley management considered axle loading damage to track insignificant over the short useful life of logging branches. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #17 in 1908. Reboilered by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops in February 1915. The new 40″ diameter 180 PSI boiler increased engine weight to 28 tons and axle loading to 10 tons. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in December 1919. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used as a standby engine until the railroad was dismantled in 1935. Scrapped in 1936.

SR&RL #18

Baldwin #13733 built 9/1893 as Sandy River 2nd #2.

20 ton outside frame 2-6-0
36″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
13 ton tender carried 1000 gallons water & 1.5 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #2 (2nd) (1893 – 1905).

Sandy River #7 (1905 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #18 (1908 – 1936)

Substantially rebuilt as a Prairie locomotive in 1916.

This was a repeat of the Laurel River & Hot Springs Mogul design. Purchased to handle increasing volumes of lumber being received from Philips & Rangeley and Franklin & Megantic railroads. Used as the preferred Sandy River freight engine until delivery of Sandy River #8 in 1904. Then used as a standby freight engine. Renumbered Sandy River #7 in June 1905. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #18 in 1908. Rebuilt January 1916 by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops adding a trailing truck to support a larger boiler, and a proportionally larger tender was provided similar to the original design of Sandy River #8, and identical to the recently completed conversion of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #16. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Subsequently used system wide in freight and mixed service. Wrecked when Kingfield bridge collapsed on 29 May 1922. Burned in 12 February 1923 Phillips enginehouse fire. Repaired, and received a new tender built by Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1926. Used as a standby engine during receivership. Pulled the Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes scrapping train in 1936. Scrapped at Farmington when dismantling was complete.

SR&RL #19

Baldwin #23874 built 3/1904 as Sandy River #8.

25 ton outside frame 2-6-2
40″ diameter 180psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
19 ton tender carried 1500 gallons water & 2 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #8 (1904 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #19 (1908 – 1935).

This engine was the first Prairie type on the Maine two foot gauge railroads. A larger boiler was supported by adding a trailing truck to the frame designed for the Laurel River & Hot Springs Mogul, and a proportionally larger tender was provided. Purchased to handle lumber traffic produced by new sawmills at Madrid and Bigelow. Used as the preferred freight engine on the Phillips to Farmington main line until Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #23 delivered in 1913. Then used system wide. Wrecked north of Strong on 22 March 1907. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #19 in 1908. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Burned in 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. Repaired, but unused after 1932. Scrapped in 1935.

SR&RL #20

Baldwin #23245 built 11/1903 as Eustis #7.

Configuration: 28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #7 (1903-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #20 (1911 – 1936).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the first of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #20 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in 1917. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Used as a standby engine until damaged in a wreck on 22 November 1922. Thereafter stored outdoors unrepaired and scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

SR&RL #21

Baldwin #23754 built 2/1904 as Eustis #8.
Configuration:
28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.
This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #8 (1904-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #21 (1911 – 1935).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the second of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #21 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in June 1917. Burned in the 3 October 1917 Rangeley engine house fire. Fitted with electric headlight in December 1920. Burned in the 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used sparingly as a standby engine until it broke a driver axle in 1932. Scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

SR&RL #22

Baldwin #23755 built 2/1904 as Eustis #9.

Configuration: 28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #9 (1904-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #22 (1911 – 1935).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the third of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #22 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in 1917. Fitted with electric headlight in 1920. Struck an automobile near Rangeley on 17 September 1920 in the only documented grade crossing fatality of the Maine 2 foot gauge railroads. Burned in the 12 February 1923 Phillips enginehouse fire. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used sparingly as a standby engine. Stored outdoors at Phillips following abandonment of service to Rangeley. Scrapped in 1935.

SR&RL #23

These notes were originally compiled by Al Wellman.

Baldwin #40733 built 10/1913 as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #23.
Configuration:
32 ton outside frame 2-6-2
48″ diameter 180psi boiler
13″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
22 ton tender carried 2000 gallons water & 3 tons coal.

This locomotive served as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #23 (1913 – 1936).

This design was Maine Central Railroad’s attempt to increase the pulling capacity of its subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes freight engines. Although axle loading was increased beyond the capacity of widely used 35 pound rail, full throttle power under load initiated wheel slip. The design was not repeated, and subsequent Prairie type #24 reverted to the weight and power characteristics of 1904 design Sandy River #8. Purchased to replace 4 pre-1890 Forneys scrapped in 1912. Used exclusively for freight and snow trains on the heavy rail main line from Phillips to Farmington. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Not used after 1932. Scrapped in 1936.

SR&RL #24

Baldwin #51804 built 5/1919 as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #24.

27 ton outside frame 2-6-2
42″ diameter 180psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
22 ton tender carried 2000 gallons water & 3 tons coal.

This locomotive served as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #24 (1919 – 1937).

This engine was a modernized repetition of Sandy River #8. Purchased for general freight service during peak pulpwood cutting for First World War paper contracts. Wrecked on the Madrid branch on 10 July 1919. Tender then rebuilt at Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops in October 1919 to reduce width and improve stability. Wrecked on a plow train near Madrid station on 11 March 1920. During receivership became the preferred mixed freight engine on the former Franklin & Megantic — and, following abandonment of the former Phillips & Rangeley in 1932, system wide during summer months. Purchased by a railfan when Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes railroad was dismantled in 1936. Scrapped in 1937.

 

Prototype Information: the Eustis locomotives

The notes on individual locomotives were originally collated and published by Chuck Collins, and are re-published here with his permission. The introduction, updates and formatting for this blog by Terry Smith.

The Eustis Railroad

The Eustis Railroad was chartered in 1903 by the P&R and ran from a junction with the P&R at Eustis Junction some 15 or so miles to Berlin Mills and Skunk Brook Camp via Dago Junction. It was primarily a logging line to transport the forest to Boston as lumber and lumber products.

The railroad and its locomotives were merged into the Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad company in January 1911, delayed by financial considerations and the company ceased to exist as a separate entity.

Eustis #7

Baldwin #23245 built 11/1903 as Eustis #7.

Configuration: 28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #7 (1903-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #20 (1911 – 1936).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the first of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #20 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in 1917. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Used as a standby engine until damaged in a wreck on 22 November 1922. Thereafter stored outdoors unrepaired and scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

Eustis #8

Baldwin #23754 built 2/1904 as Eustis #8.
Configuration:
28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.
This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #8 (1904-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #21 (1911 – 1935).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the second of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #21 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in June 1917. Burned in the 3 October 1917 Rangeley engine house fire. Fitted with electric headlight in December 1920. Burned in the 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used sparingly as a standby engine until it broke a driver axle in 1932. Scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

Eustis #9

Baldwin #23755 built 2/1904 as Eustis #9.

Configuration: 28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #9 (1904-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #22 (1911 – 1935).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the third of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #22 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in 1917. Fitted with electric headlight in 1920. Struck an automobile near Rangeley on 17 September 1920 in the only documented grade crossing fatality of the Maine 2 foot gauge railroads. Burned in the 12 February 1923 Phillips enginehouse fire. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used sparingly as a standby engine. Stored outdoors at Phillips following abandonment of service to Rangeley. Scrapped in 1935.

Prototype Information: the P&R locomotives

The notes on individual locomotives were originally collated and published by Chuck Collins, and are re-published here with his permission. The introduction, updates and formatting for this blog by Terry Smith. Updated 15-01-2015.

The Phillips and Rangeley Railroad

The Phillips and Rangeley Railroad started building in 1889 from an end-on junction with the Sandy River Railroad at Phillips and ran the 29 miles to Rangeley. It was financed by Boston business men who owned forests north of the line in order to get their lumber products to the Boston markets. The railroad finally reached Rangeley in July 1891.

The P&R chartered the Madrid Railroad in 1902 as a paper company which was wholly owned and operated by the P&R, and which never owned any locomotives or rolling stock. It ran for 15 miles from a junction with the parent P&R at Madrid Junction to Bracket Junction and ended as two forks reaching Gray’s Farm and a logging camp called No. Six.

In 1903 the P&R chartered the Eustis Railroad as a wholly owned subsidiary company. It ran from a junction with the P&R at Eustis Junction some 15 or so miles to Berlin Mills and Skunk Brook Camp via Dago Junction, and owned its own locomotives.

The P&R and its subsidiaries formed one of the two major groups that finally merged to become the Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad company in January 1908 (the Eustis excepted) and ceased to exist as a separate entities. The Eustis line joined the consolidation later in 1911.

P&R #1

Portland #615 built 10/1890 as Phillips and Rangeley #1 Calvin Putnam.

18 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
34″ diameter 140psi boiler
10.5″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank held 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #1 (1890 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #7 (1908 – 1935)

This engine was built in a joint order with Sandy River #4. The two engines reflected Portland Company’s execution of the pattern purchased from the defunct Hinkley Locomotive Works. This locomotive was 20% heavier than the engines Hinkley had built for the Bridgton & Saco River, Franklin & Megantic, and Monson railroads. It was the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine at the time of its delivery. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 5.5 tons per axle was a full ton greater than the Hinkley design. This Portland design proved to be the most successful and enduring for the Maine 2 foot gauge railroads. Forty years later, locomotives of this design pulled the final trains on the Kennebec Central, Monson, and Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington railroads. This engine was assigned to Phillips & Rangeley passenger service including through trains over the Sandy River during summer months. The original Portland cab was damaged in 1904 and replaced by a less ornate Baldwin style cab. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #7 in 1908 and used as a standby passenger engine following delivery of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #9 in 1909. Derailed at a washout between Kingfield and Salem on 15 April 1912. Rolled over with passenger train during low speed collision with another train at Strong on 8 July 1916. Little used following purchase of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #24 in 1919. Stored outdoors in 1923 and scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

P&R #2 (1st)

Hinkley #1261 built 1877 as Billerica & Bedford Puck.

12 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
30″ diameter 130psi boiler
8″x12″ cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank carried 400 gallons water and 1/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Billerica & Bedford #2 Puck (1878 – 1879) as a strict cab forward Forney design.

Sandy River #2 Echo (1879 – 1890) rebuilt as a conventional boiler first locomotive.

Phillips & Rangeley #2 Bo Peep (1890 – 1893)

Phillips & Rangeley #4 Bo Peep (1893 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #4 (1908 – 1912)

This locomotive was a reorder of the Billerica and Bedford Ariel design to be used as a standby engine. Built to run tank first. Purchased by Sandy River Railroad following dismantling of Billerica and Bedford Railroad. Rebuilt by the Hinkley Works in Boston in April 1879 as Sandy River Echo #2 running boiler first and using wood fuel. Used as Sandy River construction engine beginning 25 September 1879. Pulled the first passenger train to Strong 12 November 1879. Sold to Phillips and Rangeley Railroad as P&R #2 Bo Peep in July 1890 and used as Phillips and Rangeley construction engine. Renumbered Phillips & Rangeley #4 and used as a standby engine following purchase of Phillips & Rangeley 2nd #2 in 1893. Used for summer only passenger service between Rangeley and Green Farm upon completion of the Eustis Railroad in 1904. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #4 in 1908, but little used following discontinuance of Eustis branch passenger service in same year. Scrapped September 1912 as Maine Central Railroad modernized subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes locomotive fleet.

P&R #2 (2nd)

Baldwin #13276 built 3/1893 as Phillips & Rangeley second #2.

Configuration: 26 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
38″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
35″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #2 (2nd) (1893 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #17 (1908 – 1936)

For the third time in as many purchases, Phillips & Rangeley Railroad ordered what became the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 9 tons per axle was twice the loading of the Hinkley engines and almost 50% greater than Phillips & Rangeley #3. This engine similarly doubled the weight of the Hinkley design. Pulling power was similar to Phillips & Rangeley #3 mogul, but the absence of a separate tender made backing easier where no turntable was available. Sloshing water in partially filled leading tenders was subsequently blamed for several derailments on the rough track of logging branches. Phillips & Rangeley #2 proved well suited to branch line logging operations. Phillips & Rangeley management considered axle loading damage to track insignificant over the short useful life of logging branches. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #17 in 1908. Reboilered by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops in February 1915. The new 40″ diameter 180 PSI boiler increased engine weight to 28 tons and axle loading to 10 tons. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in December 1919. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used as a standby engine until the railroad was dismantled in 1935. Scrapped in 1936.

P&R #3

Baldwin #11706 built 3/1891 as Phillips & Rangeley #3 George M. Goodwin.

Configuration: 23 ton outside frame 2-6-0
42″ diameter 130psi boiler
13″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
15 ton tender held 1200 gallons water & 2 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #3 (1891 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #15 (1908 – 1935)

Rebuilt as a Prairie locomotive in 1912.

Phillips & Rangeley Railroad had again taken delivery of the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 6.3 tons per axle was 20% greater than Portland’s Phillips & Rangeley #1. The engine alone was 30% heavier than Phillips & Rangeley #1 and it was the first locomotive with a separate tender on the Maine two foot gauge railroads. Observation of its performance provided basis for the improved design later built for Laurel River & Hot Springs. Purchased to handle lumber traffic produced by the Redington sawmill. Used as the preferred Phillips & Rangeley freight engine. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #15 in 1908. Rebuilt in 1912 by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops as a 25 ton 2-6-2 with a 42″ diameter 180 PSI boiler, 12.5×16 inch cylinders, and a 19 ton tender. This was the first engine rebuilt by Maine Central, and results were observed and applied to future Mogul conversions. Boiler steam capacity was still inadequate for 12.5″ diameter cylinders. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Used in general freight service until it broke a driver axle 12 February 1923. Never repaired. Scrapped in 1935

P&R #4

The original #2 was re-numbered as  Phillips & Rangeley #4 (1905 -1908)

See entry for original #2 above for more details.

 

Prototype Information: the SR locomotives

The notes on individual locomotives were originally collated and published by Chuck Collins, and are re-published here with his permission. The introduction, updates and formatting for this blog by Terry Smith. Updated 15-01-2015.

The Sandy River Railroad

The Sandy River Railroad ran the 18 miles from Farmington to Phillips. The railroad was chartered and building started in 1879 and the SR fortuitously managed to acquire the former B&B locomotives, rolling stock and track from the mysterious “Mr Brown of New Hampshire” who had acquired them a year earlier when the B&B line folded in June 1978 and its assets sold. The Sandy River Railroad was originally financed by the towns of Strong, Phillips, Madrid and Rangeley and private investors.

It is believed that some of the original SR backer’s then went onto to separately finance the Franklin & Megantic Railroad. These common owners then became one of the groups that agreed to the “Franklin County Consolidation” in January 1908 which lead to the Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad company being formed to acquire and operate all the separate lines and companies.

The railroad merged into the Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad company in January 1908 and ceased to exist as a separate entity, although popular vernacular still refers to the Sandy River for the merged system after 1908.

SR #1

Hinkley #1251 built 1877 as Billerica & Bedford Ariel.

12 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
30″ diameter 130psi boiler
8″x12″ cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank carried 400 gallons water and 1/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Billerica & Bedford #1 Ariel (1878 – 1879) as a strict cab forward Forney design.

Sandy River #1 Dawn (1879 – 1890) rebuilt as a conventional boiler first locomotive.

Rebuilt in 1882 with longer wheelbase, larger cab and water tank.

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #1 (1908 – 1912)

This was the first two foot gauge engine built for New England, and was virtually identical to Billerica and Bedford Puck built shortly thereafter. Built to run tank first. Purchased by Sandy River Railroad following dismantling of Billerica and Bedford Railroad. Rebuilt by the Hinkley Works in Boston in April 1879 as Sandy River Dawn #1 running boiler first and using wood fuel. Used as Sandy River Railroad construction engine beginning October 1879. Wrecked on plow train at Sandy River bridge south of Phillips 23 January 1882. Rebuilt March 1882 with longer wheelbase, larger cab, and tank capacity increased to 500 gallons. Became the preferred Sandy River engine following rebuilding. Used for passenger service following delivery of Sandy River #4 in October 1890. Reconverted to coal burning in 1893. Used as a standby engine following purchase of Sandy River 2nd #2 in 1893. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #1 in 1908 consolidation. Little used following purchase of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #9 in 1909. Scrapped September 1912 as Maine Central Railroad modernized subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes locomotive fleet.

Editors note: 20-05-2017: the statements in italics need checking, as they appear incorrect by later photographs.

SR #2 (1st)

Hinkley #1261 built 1877 as Billerica & Bedford Puck.

12 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
30″ diameter 130psi boiler
8″x12″ cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank carried 400 gallons water and 1/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Billerica & Bedford #2 Puck (1878 – 1879) as a strict cab forward Forney design.

Sandy River #2 Echo (1879 – 1890) rebuilt as a conventional boiler first locomotive.

Phillips & Rangeley #2 Bo Peep (1890 – 1893)

Phillips & Rangeley #4 Bo Peep (1893 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #4 (1908 – 1912)

This locomotive was a reorder of the Billerica and Bedford Ariel design to be used as a standby engine. Built to run tank first. Purchased by Sandy River Railroad following dismantling of Billerica and Bedford Railroad. Rebuilt by the Hinkley Works in Boston in April 1879 as Sandy River Echo #2 running boiler first and using wood fuel. Used as Sandy River construction engine beginning 25 September 1879. Pulled the first passenger train to Strong 12 November 1879. Sold to Phillips and Rangeley Railroad as P&R #2 Bo Peep in July 1890 and used as Phillips and Rangeley construction engine. Renumbered Phillips & Rangeley #4 and used as a standby engine following purchase of Phillips & Rangeley 2nd #2 in 1893. Used for summer only passenger service between Rangeley and Green Farm upon completion of the Eustis Railroad in 1904. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #4 in 1908, but little used following discontinuance of Eustis branch passenger service in same year. Scrapped September 1912 as Maine Central Railroad modernized subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes locomotive fleet.

SR  #2 (2nd)

Baldwin #13733 built 9/1893 as Sandy River 2nd #2.

20 ton outside frame 2-6-0
36″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
13 ton tender carried 1000 gallons water & 1.5 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #2 (2nd) (1893 – 1905).

Sandy River #7 (1905 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #18 (1908 – 1936)

Substantially rebuilt as a Prairie locomotive in 1916.

This was a repeat of the Laurel River & Hot Springs Mogul design. Purchased to handle increasing volumes of lumber being received from Philips & Rangeley and Franklin & Megantic railroads. Used as the preferred Sandy River freight engine until delivery of Sandy River #8 in 1904. Then used as a standby freight engine. Renumbered Sandy River #7 in June 1905. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #18 in 1908. Rebuilt January 1916 by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops adding a trailing truck to support a larger boiler, and a proportionally larger tender was provided similar to the original design of Sandy River #8, and identical to the recently completed conversion of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #16. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Subsequently used system wide in freight and mixed service. Wrecked when Kingfield bridge collapsed on 29 May 1922. Burned in 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. Repaired, and received a new tender built by Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1926. Used as a standby engine during receivership. Pulled the Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes scrapping train in 1936. Scrapped at Farmington when dismantling was complete.

SR #3 (1st)

Porter #565 built 4/1883 as Sandy River #3.

Configuration: 14 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
31″ diameter 130psi boiler
9″x14″ cylinders
38″ drivers
Rear tank carried 550 gallons water & 1 ton wood.

This locomotive served as Sandy River #3 (1883 – 1894).

Wiscasset & Quebec #1 (1894 – 1901).

Wiscasset Waterville & Farmington Railroad #1 (1901 – 1906).

Wiscasset Waterville & Farmington Railway #1 (1906 – 1916).

This was the least successful 2 foot gauge engine design to operate in Maine. Its frame was long and rigid in comparison to the contemporary Hinkley pattern later used by Portland, and 38 inch drivers raised the center of gravity. Derailed easily and was especially troublesome on newly laid track. Used as a standby engine for the Sandy River, Franklin & Megantic, and Phillips & Rangeley railroads. Rebuilt to burn coal when sold to Wiscasset & Quebec Railroad as W&Q #1. Used as Wiscasset & Quebec construction engine beginning in September 1894. Used as standby engine following delivery of W&Q #2 and #3 from Portland in November 1894. Little used following discontinuance of service on Winslow branch in 1912. Scrapped in 1916 and boiler used as a culvert in Whitefield.

SR #3 (2nd)

Baldwin #12964 built 10/1892 as Laurel River & Hot Springs James Wyman.

20 ton outside frame 2-6-0
38″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
13 ton tender carried 700 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Laurel River & Hot Springs James Wyman (1892)

Sandy River #3 (2nd) (1900 – 1905).

Sandy River #6 (1905 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #16 (1908 – 1936)

Substantially rebuilt as a Prairie locomotive in 1915.

This improved Mogul design was based on observation of Phillips & Rangeley #3. The North Carolina lumber operation for which it was built failed within a few months, and the engine was brought to Wiscasset on 20 January 1897. The engine was put in storage in Portland when the Wiscasset & Quebec Railroad was unable to pay for it. Built with air brakes and became the first Maine 2 foot gauge engine so equipped. Delivered to the Sandy River railroad in February 1900. Renumbered Sandy River 2nd #3 and became the preferred freight engine on Sandy River subsidiary Franklin & Megantic Railroad. Overturned in switching test by Orris Vose at Salem Summit on 29 October 1900. Derailed on a plow train at Salem Flat on 8 February 1901. Renumbered Sandy River #6 in June 1905. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #16 in 1908. Rebuilt October 1915 by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops adding a trailing truck to support a larger boiler, and a proportionally larger tender was provided similar to the original design of Sandy River #8. Subsequently used system wide in freight and mixed service. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Burned in 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. After completion of repairs rolled over during low speed collision with Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #23 at Phillips in 1924. Unused after 1932. Scrapped during dismantling of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad in 1935.

SR #4

Portland #616 built 10/1890 as Sandy River #4.

18 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT 3
34″ diameter 140psi boiler
10.5″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank carried 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #4 (1890 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #5 (1908 – 1919).

This engine was built in a joint order with Phillips and Rangeley #1. The two engines reflected Portland Company’s initial modification of the Hinkley design. This engine was ordered to replace Sandy River #2 when that engine was sold to the Phillips and Rangeley. Used as the Sandy River freight engine until Sandy River #5 was delivered in May 1891. Then assigned to passenger service including the Rangeley Express. Burned in Phillips 19 June 1897 engine house fire. Derailed by ice and overturned on a Phillips & Rangeley plow train between Dallas and Dead River Station on 21 January 1903 with Dana Aldrich as engineer. Derailed by excessive speed and rolled over with the southbound Rangeley Express north of Strong on 8 September 1906. Used as a standby passenger engine following delivery of Sandy River #16 in 1907. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #5 in 1908 consolidation. Derailed and rolled over with passenger train near Carrabasset 26 October 1913. Little used following purchase of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #10 in 1916. Scrapped when Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #24 was delivered in 1919.

SR #5

Portland #622 built 5/1891 as Sandy River #5 N. B. Beal.

18 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
34″ diameter 140psi boiler
10.5″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank carried 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #5 (1890 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #6 (1908 – 1925).

Kennebec Central as KC #4 (1908 – 1925).

Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington #9 (1908 – 1925).

Currently at the WW&F Museum.

This engine was a repeat order for the design of Sandy River #4. Purchased to handle lumber traffic being produced by mills on the newly completed Phillips and Rangeley Railroad. Used as the Sandy River freight engine until Sandy River 2nd #2 was delivered in September 1893. Overturned at Strong in December 1892, and repaired with a new cab January 1893. Burned in Phillips 19 June 1897 engine house fire. Engineer Will Barker was killed when this engine was hit and overturned by a standard gauge engine at the Farmington diamond on 20 December 1897. Used as the Franklin & Megantic freight engine from completion of repairs in February 1898 until the former Laurel River & Hot Springs mogul was purchased in February, 1900. Then used as the Franklin and Megantic passenger engine. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #6 in 1908. Overturned with passenger train south of Salem Summit 23 January 1917. Electric headlight installed 13 December 1921. Sold to the Kennebec Central as KC #4 in 1925 and used as their standby engine until discontinuance of service in 1929. Purchased by Frank Winter and moved to Wiscasset in 1932. Renumbered Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington #9 and used as the standby engine until discontinuance of service on the Wiscasset, Waterville and Farmington in 1933. Purchased by a railfan and moved to Connecticut in 1937.

SR #6

The second #3 was re-numbered as  Sandy River #6 (1905 -1908)

See entry for the second #3 above for more details.

SR #7

The second #2 was re-numbered as  Sandy River #7 (1905 -1908)

See entry for the second #2 above for more details.

SR #8

Baldwin #23874 built 3/1904 as Sandy River #8.

25 ton outside frame 2-6-2
40″ diameter 180psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
19 ton tender carried 1500 gallons water & 2 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #8 (1904 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #19 (1908 – 1935).

This engine was the first Prairie type on the Maine two foot gauge railroads. A larger boiler was supported by adding a trailing truck to the frame designed for the Laurel River & Hot Springs Mogul, and a proportionally larger tender was provided. Purchased to handle lumber traffic produced by new sawmills at Madrid and Bigelow. Used as the preferred freight engine on the Phillips to Farmington main line until Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #23 delivered in 1913. Then used system wide. Wrecked north of Strong on 22 March 1907. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #19 in 1908. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Burned in 12 February 1923 Phillips enginehouse fire. Repaired, but unused after 1932. Scrapped in 1935.

SR #16

Baldwin #31826 built 9/1907 as Sandy River #16.

Configuration:
28 ton inside frame 2-4-4RT
41″ diameter 180psi boiler
11.5″x14″ cylinders
35″ drivers
Rear tank carried 800 gallons water & 1.5 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #16 (1907 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #8 (1908 – 1935).

This was one of a pair of engines built to Bridgton master mechanic Mel Caswell’s specification for inside frames. The other was Bridgton and Saco River #6. These were the largest Maine 2 foot gauge engines built with inside frames, and the only inside frame engines Baldwin built for the Maine 2 foot gauge railroads. Sandy River’s next order to Baldwin, after a year of experience with this engine, was for an identical engine with outside frames. Purchased to replace the Portland Forneys with more power for the Rangeley Express. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #8 in 1908. Engineer Frank Hodgman was killed when this engine left the rails and tipped over at Fairbanks while pulling the 11 August 1917 Rangeley Express northbound. Used as a standby engine for low speed work following that wreck. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Burned in the 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. Not repaired and scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.