Prototype Information: the Eustis locomotives

The notes on individual locomotives were originally collated and published by Chuck Collins, and are re-published here with his permission. The introduction, updates and formatting for this blog by Terry Smith.

The Eustis Railroad

The Eustis Railroad was chartered in 1903 by the P&R and ran from a junction with the P&R at Eustis Junction some 15 or so miles to Berlin Mills and Skunk Brook Camp via Dago Junction. It was primarily a logging line to transport the forest to Boston as lumber and lumber products.

The railroad and its locomotives were merged into the Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad company in January 1911, delayed by financial considerations and the company ceased to exist as a separate entity.

Eustis #7

Baldwin #23245 built 11/1903 as Eustis #7.

Configuration: 28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #7 (1903-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #20 (1911 – 1936).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the first of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #20 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in 1917. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Used as a standby engine until damaged in a wreck on 22 November 1922. Thereafter stored outdoors unrepaired and scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

Eustis #8

Baldwin #23754 built 2/1904 as Eustis #8.
Configuration:
28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.
This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #8 (1904-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #21 (1911 – 1935).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the second of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #21 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in June 1917. Burned in the 3 October 1917 Rangeley engine house fire. Fitted with electric headlight in December 1920. Burned in the 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used sparingly as a standby engine until it broke a driver axle in 1932. Scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

Eustis #9

Baldwin #23755 built 2/1904 as Eustis #9.

Configuration: 28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #9 (1904-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #22 (1911 – 1935).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the third of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #22 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in 1917. Fitted with electric headlight in 1920. Struck an automobile near Rangeley on 17 September 1920 in the only documented grade crossing fatality of the Maine 2 foot gauge railroads. Burned in the 12 February 1923 Phillips enginehouse fire. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used sparingly as a standby engine. Stored outdoors at Phillips following abandonment of service to Rangeley. Scrapped in 1935.

Locomotive models available by prototype roadname; Eustis

 

Railroad

Loco #

 Locomotive

Manufacturer

min radius

Notes

Eustis

roster info Carter

Eustis

7

Forney 0-4-4T

 NJ/CB-Daiyoung

model

38″

transferred to SR&RL #20 1911, model built as SR&RL #20

Eustis

8

Forney 0-4-4T

 NJ/CB-Daiyoung

 model

38″

transferred to SR&RL #21 1911, model built as SR&RL #21

Eustis

9

Forney 0-4-4T

 NJ/CB-Daiyoung

model

38″

transferred to SR&RL #22 1911, model built as SR&RL #22

What are “the Maine Two Footers”?

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The former Monson locomotive #3, seen here at the Portland Narrow Gauge Museum in 1997 is a typical Maine Two Foot locomotive. The narrowness of two foot gauge track is evident at the feet of the onlookers.

What are “the Maine Two Footers”?

Most enthusiasts would recognise them as a group of two foot gauge railroads that were built in Maine from the 1880’s onwards, and operated as common carriers to their local communities until as late as the 1940’s.

They were characterised by using the same locomotives designs, and the same suppliers for rolling stock initially, and later worked co-operatively to develop better and larger locomotives. A number of locomotives and coaches changed lines at various stages of their careers.

The lines are;-

B&SR; – Bridgton and Saco River (after 1927 Bridgton and Harrison B&H)

KC – Kennebec Central

Monson – The Monson

SR&RL – Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes (formerly Sandy River, Franklin & Megantic, Phillips & Rangeley, Eustis) with two associated lines Madrid RR, Kingfield & Dead River RR which were both developed to handle lumber interest in the area, but never had equipment of their own.

WW&F – Wiscasset Waterville and Farmington (formerly Wiscasset & Quebec).

The first two foot gauge common carrier railroad built on the East Coast was the ill fated Billerica & Bedford railroad in Massachusetts which started the interest in two foot railroads but only operated  for nine months, before the equipment was sold to the then building Sandy River Railroad.

A lot of the equipment was to later return to Massachusetts when the remnants of the Bridgton and Harrison line and two Monson locomotives plus other various equipment were collected at South Carver to form the Edaville Railroad, which ran from 1947 until initial closure in 1993.

In line with most enthusiasts, this FAQ’s will use the term “the Maine Two Footers” to refer to and include all the above named lines. Further information on these lines can be obtained from a number of sources.

For more information about the B&SR locomotives click here.

For more information about the KC locomotives click here.

For more information about the Monson locomotives click here.

For more information about the SR&RL locomotives click here.

For more information about the WW&F locomotives click here.

Listed below are some resources currently available on the internet;-

Maine, an Encyclopedia

http://maineanencyclopedia.com/railroads-narrow-gauge/

Has a useful map showing the locations of all of the Maine Two Footers (click on image to enlarge in your browser). Some of the historical facts presented about the SR&RL are believed to be suspect.
Bridgton Historical Society
http://www.bridgtonhistory.org/Museum/NarrowGaugeRailroad/tabid/71/Default.aspx
 
B&SR Wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridgton_and_Saco_River_Railroad
 
Kennebec Central Wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kennebec_Central_Railroad
 
Monson Wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monson_Railroad

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad http://srrl-rr.org/
 
SR&RL Wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_River_and_Rangeley_Lakes_Railroad
 
WW&F Railway Museum  http://www.wwfry.org/
 
WW&FR Wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiscasset,_Waterville_and_Farmington_Railway
 
Maine Narrow Gauge Railroad Museum http://www.mainenarrowgauge.org/
 
Wikipedia page: Narrow Gauge railroads in Maine
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Narrow_gauge_railroads_in_Maine
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Narrow_gauge_railroads_in_Massachusetts
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billerica_and_Bedford_Railroad
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edaville_Railroad
 
Current Edaville theme park site
http://www.edaville.com/
 
Brian Carter has a very useful website about the Maine Two Footers at;- http://www.narrowgauge.iform.com.au/m2f.html

Written by Terry Smith 11-Aug-2013, updated 02-03-2015.