Maine On2 layouts – Ric Collin’s Phillips and Rangeley, circa 1914 – 1918

The editors gratefully acknowledge a number of informative postings by Chuck Collins to the MaineOn2 Yahoo group which have been edited and incorporated into this posting;-

Here is a little more On2 history. My brother Ric and I first started modeling the Maine two footers in 1961 after reading Allan Hanson’s article “The Sandy River Goes HOn2” in the April 1961 issue of Model  Railroad Craftsman. We began modeling in HOn2. In 1970 we switched to On2 so we could get more detail in our models.

These pictures were taken on Ric Collins’ now defunct SR&RL On2 railroad. Ric’s railroad depicted the SR&RL circa 1914-1918 and modeled the line from Phillips, Maine to Rangeley, Maine. The pictures were taken in the early 1990’s before Ric had to dismantle the railroad because of a move. It was never rebuilt.

The rumors of my demise have been greatly exaggerated. My name is Chuck Collins and I was the one that ran Narrow Gauge Specialties. I am still in this world for now but not sure for how long. My brother Ric Collins is also still living. Neither of us model in On2 anymore. We are both involved in small scale live steam trains.

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SR&RL #9 at Madrid.

Wes Ewell, a noted Maine Two Foot fan, wrote in 2008;- “I had a chance to visit Ric’s layout before he moved and it was quite a treat to see.  He ran a long curving mainline through hilly scenery between Phillips and Rangeley.  Ric’s wife Alice built most of the buildings.”

Now let’s resume that trip and enjoy the scenery.

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SR&RL #9 on Sluice hill.

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SR&RL #10 at Madrid.

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SR&RL #10 crossing Main Street.

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SR&RL #19 on the bridge.

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SR&RL #19 and log train crossing the highway.

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SR&RL #19 and log train coming down Sluice hill.

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SR&RL #20 and train going up Sluice hill.

This picture featured as the Maine On2 Yahoo! group home page heading picture early in 2008. Chuck Collins wrote “It shows my SR&RL #20 on her way up Sluice Hill. The locomotive is a Custom Brass Import which I reworked with a new micro-motor and gearbox, detailed and painted.”

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SR&RL #22 passing the Phillips engine house.

Wes Ewell wrote “Ric’s layout was most impressive. When you lifted the roof off his Phillips engine house you found a full stable of On2 locomotives, most of them scratch built using Ric’s own etchings. I had long admired the etchings that he and his brother produced back in the 1970s, so was delighted and honored when he pointed out a Portland Forney sitting in front of his Rangeley engine house that he had built from my etchings.”

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SR&RL #24 at Phillips.

This picture featured as the Maine On2 Yahoo! group home page heading picture in mid  2008. Chuck Collins wrote “It shows SR&RL #24 after her recent arrival from Baldwin Locomotive Works, sitting in front of the depot at Phillips. The locomotive is a Custom Brass Import which was detailed and painted by my brother, Ric Collins”.

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SR&RL #24 and train going up Sluice hill.

Ric’s layout was the venue for an annual get together of West Coast Maine Two Foot fans and the last of these in 1995 was captured on home video which was posted to YouTube a couple of years ago at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDdEFAlhRng

Charlie Siebenthal wrote “I had the privilege of attending many of Ric’s annual 2-foot meets. Great layout and a rare chance to rub elbows with so many 2-footers. Bob Schlechter took up the host duties for a couple of years after Ric’s move. Last I heard Ric was into live steam garden railroading and golf.”

Here is a little digression from Maine On2 ………………….to show there is life afterwards!…………..

In the heading paragraphs, supplied by Chuck Collins, he wrote that we (he and his brother Ric) are now both involved in small scale live steam trains. Here are some pictures of Ric’s 16mm scale Mount Greta & Murieta garden line;-

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The line features in a number of YouTube videos such as the Mt Greta steamup 2016 which can be seen at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ug_rZp2Wwkc

Ric’s brother, Chuck, has more eclectic tastes in his 16mm scale modelling, choosing to follow South African (and other) Two Foot gauge prototypes with his Avontuur Light Railway shown here in this YouTube video;- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4VnUZs4n_r0

 

 

Prototype Information: the P&R locomotives

The notes on individual locomotives were originally collated and published by Chuck Collins, and are re-published here with his permission. The introduction, updates and formatting for this blog by Terry Smith. Updated 15-01-2015.

The Phillips and Rangeley Railroad

The Phillips and Rangeley Railroad started building in 1889 from an end-on junction with the Sandy River Railroad at Phillips and ran the 29 miles to Rangeley. It was financed by Boston business men who owned forests north of the line in order to get their lumber products to the Boston markets. The railroad finally reached Rangeley in July 1891.

The P&R chartered the Madrid Railroad in 1902 as a paper company which was wholly owned and operated by the P&R, and which never owned any locomotives or rolling stock. It ran for 15 miles from a junction with the parent P&R at Madrid Junction to Bracket Junction and ended as two forks reaching Gray’s Farm and a logging camp called No. Six.

In 1903 the P&R chartered the Eustis Railroad as a wholly owned subsidiary company. It ran from a junction with the P&R at Eustis Junction some 15 or so miles to Berlin Mills and Skunk Brook Camp via Dago Junction, and owned its own locomotives.

The P&R and its subsidiaries formed one of the two major groups that finally merged to become the Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad company in January 1908 (the Eustis excepted) and ceased to exist as a separate entities. The Eustis line joined the consolidation later in 1911.

P&R #1

Portland #615 built 10/1890 as Phillips and Rangeley #1 Calvin Putnam.

18 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
34″ diameter 140psi boiler
10.5″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank held 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #1 (1890 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #7 (1908 – 1935)

This engine was built in a joint order with Sandy River #4. The two engines reflected Portland Company’s execution of the pattern purchased from the defunct Hinkley Locomotive Works. This locomotive was 20% heavier than the engines Hinkley had built for the Bridgton & Saco River, Franklin & Megantic, and Monson railroads. It was the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine at the time of its delivery. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 5.5 tons per axle was a full ton greater than the Hinkley design. This Portland design proved to be the most successful and enduring for the Maine 2 foot gauge railroads. Forty years later, locomotives of this design pulled the final trains on the Kennebec Central, Monson, and Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington railroads. This engine was assigned to Phillips & Rangeley passenger service including through trains over the Sandy River during summer months. The original Portland cab was damaged in 1904 and replaced by a less ornate Baldwin style cab. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #7 in 1908 and used as a standby passenger engine following delivery of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #9 in 1909. Derailed at a washout between Kingfield and Salem on 15 April 1912. Rolled over with passenger train during low speed collision with another train at Strong on 8 July 1916. Little used following purchase of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #24 in 1919. Stored outdoors in 1923 and scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

P&R #2 (1st)

Hinkley #1261 built 1877 as Billerica & Bedford Puck.

12 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
30″ diameter 130psi boiler
8″x12″ cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank carried 400 gallons water and 1/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Billerica & Bedford #2 Puck (1878 – 1879) as a strict cab forward Forney design.

Sandy River #2 Echo (1879 – 1890) rebuilt as a conventional boiler first locomotive.

Phillips & Rangeley #2 Bo Peep (1890 – 1893)

Phillips & Rangeley #4 Bo Peep (1893 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #4 (1908 – 1912)

This locomotive was a reorder of the Billerica and Bedford Ariel design to be used as a standby engine. Built to run tank first. Purchased by Sandy River Railroad following dismantling of Billerica and Bedford Railroad. Rebuilt by the Hinkley Works in Boston in April 1879 as Sandy River Echo #2 running boiler first and using wood fuel. Used as Sandy River construction engine beginning 25 September 1879. Pulled the first passenger train to Strong 12 November 1879. Sold to Phillips and Rangeley Railroad as P&R #2 Bo Peep in July 1890 and used as Phillips and Rangeley construction engine. Renumbered Phillips & Rangeley #4 and used as a standby engine following purchase of Phillips & Rangeley 2nd #2 in 1893. Used for summer only passenger service between Rangeley and Green Farm upon completion of the Eustis Railroad in 1904. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #4 in 1908, but little used following discontinuance of Eustis branch passenger service in same year. Scrapped September 1912 as Maine Central Railroad modernized subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes locomotive fleet.

P&R #2 (2nd)

Baldwin #13276 built 3/1893 as Phillips & Rangeley second #2.

Configuration: 26 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
38″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
35″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #2 (2nd) (1893 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #17 (1908 – 1936)

For the third time in as many purchases, Phillips & Rangeley Railroad ordered what became the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 9 tons per axle was twice the loading of the Hinkley engines and almost 50% greater than Phillips & Rangeley #3. This engine similarly doubled the weight of the Hinkley design. Pulling power was similar to Phillips & Rangeley #3 mogul, but the absence of a separate tender made backing easier where no turntable was available. Sloshing water in partially filled leading tenders was subsequently blamed for several derailments on the rough track of logging branches. Phillips & Rangeley #2 proved well suited to branch line logging operations. Phillips & Rangeley management considered axle loading damage to track insignificant over the short useful life of logging branches. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #17 in 1908. Reboilered by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops in February 1915. The new 40″ diameter 180 PSI boiler increased engine weight to 28 tons and axle loading to 10 tons. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in December 1919. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used as a standby engine until the railroad was dismantled in 1935. Scrapped in 1936.

P&R #3

Baldwin #11706 built 3/1891 as Phillips & Rangeley #3 George M. Goodwin.

Configuration: 23 ton outside frame 2-6-0
42″ diameter 130psi boiler
13″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
15 ton tender held 1200 gallons water & 2 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #3 (1891 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #15 (1908 – 1935)

Rebuilt as a Prairie locomotive in 1912.

Phillips & Rangeley Railroad had again taken delivery of the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 6.3 tons per axle was 20% greater than Portland’s Phillips & Rangeley #1. The engine alone was 30% heavier than Phillips & Rangeley #1 and it was the first locomotive with a separate tender on the Maine two foot gauge railroads. Observation of its performance provided basis for the improved design later built for Laurel River & Hot Springs. Purchased to handle lumber traffic produced by the Redington sawmill. Used as the preferred Phillips & Rangeley freight engine. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #15 in 1908. Rebuilt in 1912 by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops as a 25 ton 2-6-2 with a 42″ diameter 180 PSI boiler, 12.5×16 inch cylinders, and a 19 ton tender. This was the first engine rebuilt by Maine Central, and results were observed and applied to future Mogul conversions. Boiler steam capacity was still inadequate for 12.5″ diameter cylinders. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Used in general freight service until it broke a driver axle 12 February 1923. Never repaired. Scrapped in 1935

P&R #4

The original #2 was re-numbered as  Phillips & Rangeley #4 (1905 -1908)

See entry for original #2 above for more details.

 

Passenger car models availability by prototype roadnames;- P&R

P&R Passenger cars                                           Rev 1                   dated: 20-12-2013 

RR

#

Type

Model Builder

Notes

Current status

Builder

Date

P&R

1

Combine Transferred to SR&RL #13 1908

scrapped by Edaville frame used to build #20 coach

Billmeyer & Small

1890

P&R

2

Coach NJ/CB, Grandt Line Transferred to SR&RL #19 1908

MNGRR

Billmeyer & Small*

1891

P&R

3

Coach Burned at Greene’s farm 1904, rebuilt as caboose

scrapped in rebuild as caboose

Billmeyer & Small*

1891

P&R

4

Coach NJ/CB, Grandt Line Transferred to SR&RL #20 1908

MNGRR

Billmeyer & Small*

1891

P&R

5

Baggage DRL (*/#) Transferred to SR&RL #7 1908

scrapped 1935?

1889

P&R

Excursion Transferred to SR&RL #26 1908

scrapped 1924

Unknown

1899

P&R

Excursion Transferred to SR&RL #27 1908

scrapped 1935?

Unknown

1899

P&R

Excursion Transferred to SR&RL #28 1908

scrapped 1924

Unknown

1899

Deerfield River Laser make 36 foot Quik-Kits (coded * in this table), 46 foot kits (coded ** in this table) and 6 foot 6 inches wide ends (coded # in this table). See the Deerfield River Laser Two foot page for further details;- http://www.deerfieldriverlaser.com/CarsSides.html

Grandt Line does door and window sets for SR&RL stock at http://www.grandtline.com/products/mrr/mrr%20car%20and%20loco%20detail%20parts/o%20details/o_passenger_details.html

Locomotive models available by prototype roadname; P&R

Railroad

Loco #

 Locomotive

Manufacturer

min radius

Notes

P&R

roster info Carter

P&R

1 Calvin Putnam Forney 0-4-4T Portland cn615 transferred to SR&RL #7 1908

P&R

2 Isaac Walton Forney 0-4-4T Baldwin cn13276 transferred to SR&RL #17

P&R

3Geo. M. Goodwin Prairie 2-6-0 Baldwin transferred to SR&RL #15 1908

P&R

4 Bo Peep

Forney 0-4-4T Hinkley purchased  SR #2 1890, transferred to SR&RL #4 1908

P&R; Historic list of plans

Historic P&R drawings list; the content of this list of drawings was last updated on the 11th November 2003.

RR Description Reference source Vol-issue yr-mo pg-
P&R Loco #3 drawing, George M. Goodwin Geissel, H SR&RL Locomotives pg-022
P&R Baggage/RPO #5 NGSL 1995/05 pg-33
P&R Baggage/RPO #5 Kohler, Gary SR&RL Passenger Cars pg-27
P&R Dead River station, drawing in HO Carroll, Alan Structures of the Maine Two-Footers pg-21
P&R Madrid Watertank drawing in HO Barney, Peter Structures of the Maine Two-Footers pg-23
P&R Madrid Junction Station drawing in HO Moody, Linwood W. Structures of the Maine Two-Footers pg-22
P&R Phillips Paint Shop NGSL 1995/11 pg-30
P&R Phillips Paint shop, HO drawing Barney, Peter Structures of the Maine Two-Footers pg-10
P&R Rangeley Sanborn Insurance map 1924 Sanborn 1924/ pg-
P&R Sanders Station NGSL 1995/11 pg-41
P&R Sanders station drawing in HO Carroll, Alan Structures of the Maine Two-Footers pg-19
P&R Sanders water tank Dunlop, James Finelines 1970/03 v06#06 pg-13
P&R Sanders Watertank NGSL 1992/01 pg-86
P&R Sanders watertank drawing in HO Carroll, Alan Structures of the Maine Two-Footers pg-20

What are “the Maine Two Footers”?

Featured

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The former Monson locomotive #3, seen here at the Portland Narrow Gauge Museum in 1997 is a typical Maine Two Foot locomotive. The narrowness of two foot gauge track is evident at the feet of the onlookers.

What are “the Maine Two Footers”?

Most enthusiasts would recognise them as a group of two foot gauge railroads that were built in Maine from the 1880’s onwards, and operated as common carriers to their local communities until as late as the 1940’s.

They were characterised by using the same locomotives designs, and the same suppliers for rolling stock initially, and later worked co-operatively to develop better and larger locomotives. A number of locomotives and coaches changed lines at various stages of their careers.

The lines are;-

B&SR; – Bridgton and Saco River (after 1927 Bridgton and Harrison B&H)

KC – Kennebec Central

Monson – The Monson

SR&RL – Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes (formerly Sandy River, Franklin & Megantic, Phillips & Rangeley, Eustis) with two associated lines Madrid RR, Kingfield & Dead River RR which were both developed to handle lumber interest in the area, but never had equipment of their own.

WW&F – Wiscasset Waterville and Farmington (formerly Wiscasset & Quebec).

The first two foot gauge common carrier railroad built on the East Coast was the ill fated Billerica & Bedford railroad in Massachusetts which started the interest in two foot railroads but only operated  for nine months, before the equipment was sold to the then building Sandy River Railroad.

A lot of the equipment was to later return to Massachusetts when the remnants of the Bridgton and Harrison line and two Monson locomotives plus other various equipment were collected at South Carver to form the Edaville Railroad, which ran from 1947 until initial closure in 1993.

In line with most enthusiasts, this FAQ’s will use the term “the Maine Two Footers” to refer to and include all the above named lines. Further information on these lines can be obtained from a number of sources.

For more information about the B&SR locomotives click here.

For more information about the KC locomotives click here.

For more information about the Monson locomotives click here.

For more information about the SR&RL locomotives click here.

For more information about the WW&F locomotives click here.

Listed below are some resources currently available on the internet;-

Maine, an Encyclopedia

http://maineanencyclopedia.com/railroads-narrow-gauge/

Has a useful map showing the locations of all of the Maine Two Footers (click on image to enlarge in your browser). Some of the historical facts presented about the SR&RL are believed to be suspect.
Bridgton Historical Society
http://www.bridgtonhistory.org/Museum/NarrowGaugeRailroad/tabid/71/Default.aspx
 
B&SR Wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridgton_and_Saco_River_Railroad
 
Kennebec Central Wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kennebec_Central_Railroad
 
Monson Wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monson_Railroad

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad http://srrl-rr.org/
 
SR&RL Wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_River_and_Rangeley_Lakes_Railroad
 
WW&F Railway Museum  http://www.wwfry.org/
 
WW&FR Wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiscasset,_Waterville_and_Farmington_Railway
 
Maine Narrow Gauge Railroad Museum http://www.mainenarrowgauge.org/
 
Wikipedia page: Narrow Gauge railroads in Maine
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Narrow_gauge_railroads_in_Maine
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Narrow_gauge_railroads_in_Massachusetts
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billerica_and_Bedford_Railroad
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edaville_Railroad
 
Current Edaville theme park site
http://www.edaville.com/
 
Brian Carter has a very useful website about the Maine Two Footers at;- http://www.narrowgauge.iform.com.au/m2f.html

Written by Terry Smith 11-Aug-2013, updated 02-03-2015.