Library of Congress – Vintage Aerial views

The US Library of Congress has an internet accessible gallery of vintage aerial views of towns, primarily from across the USA. The gallery can be searched by a number of different terms, but perhaps the most useful is by state or location at ;- https://www.loc.gov/collections/panoramic-maps/index/location/

Click here to go to the Library of Congress page for this view in another browser window.

Be aware that a number of download styles are available, including full size versions exceeding 100MB as downloads.

 

As an aid to the Maine Two Foot enthusiast to determine whether they wish to visit the LOC site to download their own copies, we show the following reduced copy views. Clicking on these pictures will show a larger version in your browser.

Bridgton, Maine, 1888.

Bridgton 1888 03

This view shows the original Bridgton & Saco River railroad entering the town just below the ponds at the middle left. Note that the inset picture at the lower left is a coloured rendition of the black & white photograph published in many standard texts about the B&SR, including Jones’ Two Feet to the Lakes on page 36.

The pictorial view is notable for showing many of the Mills of Bridgton. Inspection of the full sized copy on the LOC site (at https://www.loc.gov/item/83694327/ ) allows the feint numbering of the mills to be read.

Click here to go to the Library of Congress page for this view in another browser window.

Monson, Maine, 1889.  

Monson 1889 03

This view is noteworthy for showing the tracks of the Monson railroad entering town, and then going to the individual slate mines beyond the station area.

The full size copy is available from https://www.loc.gov/item/73694689/

Click here to go to the Library of Congress page for this view in another browser window.

Kingfield, Maine, 1895.

Kingfield 1895 03

This view shows the original Franklin & Megantic railroad entering Kingfield as a spur while the mainline bypasses the town in the background.

The full size copy is available from https://www.loc.gov/item/2002621454/

Click here to go to the Library of Congress page for this view in another browser window.

Wiscasset, Maine, 1878. 

This view predates the building of the Wiscasset & Quebec two foot line, but does show the standard gauge line, town and wharves.

Wiscasset 1878 03

The full size copy is available from https://www.loc.gov/item/2002621455/

Click here to go to the Library of Congress page for this view in another browser window.

Gardiner, Maine, 1878.

This view predates the building of the Kennebec Central two foot line, but does show the standard gauge line on the opposite bank, the town and wharves. It also shows just how neatly the Kennebec Central was threaded through the existing landscape.

Gardiner 1878 03

The full size copy is available from https://www.loc.gov/item/2002621455/

Click here to go to the Library of Congress page for this view in another browser window.

Laconia, New Hampshire, 1883.

Although not served by a two foot line, the interest in this view is the Laconia Car Company shown in the middle of town. This company built a number of items of rolling stock for the Maine Two Footers either directly or in a previous incarnation as The Ranlet Car Company.

Laconia 1883 03

The full size copy is available from https://www.loc.gov/item/2002621455/

Click here to go to the Library of Congress page for this view in another browser window.

 

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Track Schematics – the Monson

This series of track schematics were produced by Trevor Marshall in 2007 as part of his mid-term re-design for his On2 Somerset & Piscataquis Counties RR layout, and were originally published on the groups Fotopic site. Trevor drew them up to enhance his understanding of the operations of the smaller Maine Two Footers and to demonstrate the relative simplicity of their facilities. They are not to scale and where the track work changed over time, they generally represent the largest variant. Note that the original intent of these track schematics was as model railroad LDE’s (Layout Design Elements) rather than as historically or prototypically correct representations.

Click here to view Trevor Marshall’s On2 Somerset & Piscataquis Counties RR layouts on another page.

 

MRR-01-MonsonJctc

The Monson was a pretty simple line running the six miles from Monson Village (below) and the slate quarries beyond to Monson Junction (above) where it interchanged with the Bangor & Aroostook Railroad.

MRR-02-Monsonc

Prototype Information: the Monson locomotives

tspo9701

The former Monson locomotive #3 saw some 30 years service with the Monson line in Maine before some 40+ years at Edaville in Massachussetts, and is pictured here at the Narrow Gauge Museum at Portland, Maine sometime in the late 1990’s.

The following notes on individual locomotives were originally collated and published by Chuck Collins, and are re-published here with his permission. The introduction, updates and formatting for this blog by Terry Smith. Updated 03-03-2015.

The Monson line

The Monson line was in many ways the simplest and longest lasting of the Maine Two Footers. Chartered in 1881 as the Monson & Athens Railroad, it started building in the Spring of 1883 and the first train arrived at Monson Station on September 4th.

The line ran from Monson Junction on the standard gauge Bangor & Aroostook to Monson village some six miles north. Although incorporated as a common carrier, the main function of the line was to transport finished slate products from the various slate mines north of the village to the standard gauge connection and then onto the rest of the world.

In 1885 the name of the railroad was changed to the Monson Railroad. In 1908 the Monson Maine Slate Company gained control of the railroad, and it continued to operate until it was abandoned in 1943 and scrapped in 1944.

The line continued to use link and pin couplers, hand brakes and stub switches to the end.

The two Vulcan locomotives (Monson #3 & #4) survived the scrapping operation and were later bought by railfan Ellis D Atwood for his Edaville Railroad in Massachusetts. The smaller Monson engines soon became the preferred engines for their fuel economy and reduced track maintenance requirements. Currently at the Maine Narrow Gauge Museum in Portland.

 

Monson #1

Hinkley #1621 built 7/1883 as Monson #1 G.S.Cushing.

14 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
32″ diameter 130psi boiler
9″x12″ cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank carried 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton wood.

This locomotive served as Monson #1 (1883 – 1912).

This locomotive modified the design of Bridgton & Saco River #1-2 to allow the use of wood fuel. Became Monson’s regular engine until worn out and converted to a snowplow in 1912. Rebuilt to burn coal about 1908.

Monson #2

Hinkley #1661 built 3/1884 as Monson #2 H.A.Whiting.

14 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
32″ diameter 130psi boiler
9″x12″ cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank held 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton wood.

This locomotive served as Monson #2 (1884 – 1918).

This locomotive was a repeat order of the Monson #1 design. Used as Monson’s standby engine until Monson #4 delivered in 1918. Rebuilt to burn coal about 1908 and scrapped about 1918.

Monson #3

Vulcan #2093 built 2/1913 as Monson #3.

17 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
38″ diameter 165psi boiler
10″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank carried 9/10 ton coal.

This locomotive served as Monson #3 (1913 – 1943)

Edaville #3 (1946-1993)

Currently at the Maine Narrow Gauge Museum in Portland

Vulcan updated the Portland design set by Phillips & Rangeley #1. This engine validated the original Portland design by providing decades of economical service with minimal track maintenance for both Monson and Edaville. Similar engines might have extended the life of the Bridgton & Saco River railroad just as old Portland engines kept trains running over the Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington. For Monson’s purposes, however, the design was modified by specifying a slightly lighter engine on their next order from Vulcan. Became the regular engine until Monson #4 was delivered in May, 1918. Then used as the standby engine until Monson #4 wore out in 1936. Was then Monson’s only operable engine until service was discontinued in 1943. Salvaged and rebuilt for Edaville in 1946. Became Edaville’s preferred engine until train operations were terminated. Moved to Portland Museum in 1993 and became their preferred engine.

Monson #4

Vulcan #2780 built 2/1918 as Monson #4.

16 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
36″ diameter 165psi boiler
10″x14″ cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank carried 9/10 ton coal.

This locomotive served as Monson #4 (1918 – 1943)

Edaville #4 (1946-1993)

Currently at the Maine Narrow Gauge Museum in Portland

Vulcan’s design for Monson #3 was modified to produce a slightly lighter engine — perhaps because #3 was too heavy for the Monson turntables. The inability to turn locomotives was never an adequate justification to rebuild the turntables, however for the Monson. Used as Monson’s regular engine until worn out in 1936. Salvaged and rebuilt for Edaville in 1946. Used as a standby engine until Edaville train operations were terminated. Moved to Portland Museum in 1993.

 

Passenger car models availability by prototype roadnames;- Monson

plwmc01

Monson Passenger car          Rev 0                                      18-12-2013

RR

#

Type

Model Builder

Notes

Current Status

Builder

Date

Monson

1

Combine

PLW

Laconia

1883

plwmc02

Grateful Thanks to Darryl Sleszynski of PLW for supplying the photographs of their Monson Combine kit built and photographed by Bob Bennett. Bob’s review of this kit will be published in a forthcoming Model Railroad Craftsman.

Use sidebar link on the right to get to the PLW website.

Locomotive models available by prototype roadname; Monson

Railroad

Loco #

 Locomotive

Manufacturer

min radius

Notes

Monson

roster info Carter

Monson

1

Forney 0-4-4T Hinkley purchased 1883, scrapped 1912

Monson

2

Forney 0-4-4T Hinkley purchased 1883, scrapped 1918

Monson

3

Forney 0-4-4T Vulcan purchased 1912, sold to Ellis Atwood 1945 Edaville, now at MNGRR

Monson

4

Forney 0-4-4T Vulcan purchased 1918, sold to Ellis Atwood 1945 Edaville, now at MNGRR

Monson; Historic list of plans

Historic Monson drawings list: this list of drawings was last updated on the 19th November 2003.

RR Description Author Reference  Vol-issue  yr-mo pg-
Monson Maine Two-Foot Flatcars Frary, Jim – Hayden, Bob RMC  1971/07        pg-20
Monson Boxcars 1-8 (dimensions for 1-4 & 5-8) Estey, Clyde Kennebec Central & Monson RR Technical Guide  1986/          pg-62
Monson Snow Plow NGSL  1987/01        pg-29
Monson Snow Spreader Carroll, Alan Kennebec Central & Monson RR Technical Guide  1986/          pg-62
Monson Snow Spreader NGSL  1987/01        pg-30
Monson Monson system map 1917 Two Feet to the Quarries  1998/          pg-137
Monson Monson system map (Monson-Monson Jct.) Two Feet to the Quarries  1998/          pg-006
Monson Monson yard map Barney, Peter S Kennebec Central & Monson RR Technical Guide  1986/          pg-64
Monson Monson, yard map Bond, Edward Two Feet to the Quarries  1998/          pg-000i
Monson Monson Jct. Freight Station NGSL  1978/09        pg-62
Monson Monson Jct. watertank Barney, Peter S Kennebec Central & Monson RR Technical Guide  1986/          pg-63
Monson Monson Jct. yard map Barney, Peter S Kennebec Central & Monson RR Technical Guide  1986/          pg-64
Monson Monson Jct. yard map Bond, Edward Two Feet to the Quarries  1998/          pg-153

The Book list – Part 5 – The Monson

monbk1

Maine Two Foot Railroad Books

Author

Year

Library #

Monson

 Revision date: 17 August 2013
Vol 1 – The Kennebec Central and Monson Railroads Peter S. Barney 1986 68 pages, 8½ x 11, LOC 86-070947
Vol 2 – Structures of the Maine Two Footers – B&SR, Kennebec Central & Monson Peter S. Barney 1988 64 pages, 11 x  8½,  LOC 88-071314
Vol 8 – Industries & Operations of the Maine Two-Foot Gauge Railroads: Operations on the B&SR, Kennebec Central, WW&F and Monson Peter S. Barney 1997 84 pages, 11 x 8½, LOC 88-071314
Kennebec Central and Monson Railroads, A Pictorial Journey Peter S. Barney 2008 96 pages, 8½ x 5½, 159 photos, 20 plans
Monson – The Switzerland of Maine 1989  Reprinted 1995, 32 pages, 5½ x 8½
Monson Railroad Maine’s Two Foot Narrow Gauge Railroad to the Slate Quarries Roger Whitney 1989 88 pages, 5¼ x 8¼, Reprinted 1994
Two Feet to the Quarries – The Monson Railroad Robert C Jones 1998 98-87962 ISBN 0-9667264-0-5       First Edition150 pages, 8½ x 11
The Monson Railroad and its Proposed Extension Mitchell Construction Co. Reproduction by Edwin Robertson12 pages, 5½ x 8½
  A Pictorial History of the Monson Railroad Gary Kohler/M2FQ 120 + pages, 400 photos