Custom Brass – SR&RL Boxcar #67 kit.

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Custom Brass announced their wooden craftsman style boxcar kit with their advertisement in the September/October 1975 edition of the NG&SL Gazette.

 

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The Custom Brass SR&RL #67 Boxcar kit was typical of what was called “a craftsman style kit”, meaning that compared to today’s (2016) kits, significant cutting, trimming and use of tools to fit details was expected.

The picture above shows the construction style well. The wooden pieces in the upper right are a milled floor (with integral side, intermediate and centre sills), the shaped sub-roof piece and two end blocks. These formed the basic body to which scribed side and end sheathing was applied, followed by plain sheeting for the roof and then strip-wood for fascia’s, ladders and roof walks.

The Custom Brass kit features a bag of black plastic details for the airbrake cylinders, other brake gear and NBW’s, and a bag of brass details for the stirrup steps, queen posts and brake wheel.

Trevor Marshall’s second S&PCRR boxcar, built from the NJ/CB kit

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In June 2007 Trevor Marshall posted the following message to the On2 Yahoo! group;-

S&PCRR doubles its boxcar fleet

Hi List:

Yes, it’s true. Until today, my On2 railroad had ONE boxcar – a Sandy River Car Shops kit built by a friend and acquired when he sold off his On2 equipment. I’ve just been too busy building flat cars for the slate quarry.

However, I decided to do something different – one can only build so many flat cars in a row, after all – so a while ago I started work on an NJ International wooden kit (acquired from another friend who was selling off his On2 equipment… hmm: I see a pattern!). The kit was for SR&RL boxcars 67-76, which were 28-foot cars. I modeled it as Somerset & Piscataquis Counties #68.

This was an interesting experience.

The kit included all the basics, but was missing information like how to route brake rods and pipes, and many details like the dozens of NBWs used on grab irons, etc. Plus, of course, a tin roof made of individual panels of thick embossing tin.

I’ve posted a few photos in the TPM-Projects folder in the photos section of the web site. Editors’ note the pictures are shown below.

It’s “finished”, although I’m waiting for some air hoses to add to the ends. The S&PCRR now has TWO boxcars!

Happy modeling…
– Trevor

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Originally posted 19-08-2016, updated 20-08-2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Track gauges – On2

In this post we show some of the commercially produced gauges available at various times.

Simpson roller track gauge.

Russ Simpson produced these gauges to suit variety of rail sizes (eg codes 55, 70, 83 & 100). They were first announced in July 1977 and were available direct and from suppliers such as Coronado Scale Models, Caboose Hobbies and BK Enterprises.

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Portland Products NMRA style gauge.

Bob Werner produced this style gauge back in the mid 1990’s, and examples may turn up on eBay. One was offered as recently as mid-June 2016.

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We know that SRE produced a cast brass three point gauge way back in 1970’s but we don’t have a picture or two – can you help?

On2 Yahoo group member John Rogers also produced a three point gauge in the late 2000’s to early 2010’s, but again we don’t have a picture or two – can you help?

Revised 02-07-2016.

Temporary Post: The Beeches Light Railway Carrabasset Parlor Car

This post is temporary to support a thread on the Maine On2 Yahoo! group. It does not form part of the Maine On2 FAQ’s, but is posted here for convenience.

Terry Smith writes: “we’ve just got back from our first caravan trip this year – to our favourite site in Wales – up in the hills near Tan Y Bwlch on the other side of the valley. So I’ve now seen the Beeches Light Railway’s Carrabasset Parlor Car on a daily (or more frequent) basis – it seems that it never moved for the whole week that we were passing by – it was stuck at Boston Lodge on the track leading to the passenger equipment storage sheds nearest to the sea. It was pretty visible, but very awkwardly placed for decent photographs. I did not want to trespass or climb over sea walls for better pictures.”

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General view of the Festiniog Railway’s Boston Lodge Works with the Carrabasset Parlor Car.

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Just in case there happens to be a question about the location…….

 

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Close – up view.

Update: 18 – May – 2016: while Carrabasset appeared to be stationary throughout my sojourn in the neighbourhood, it has been put to use at other times as on trips such as the Snowdonian and the Afternoon tea party. Click on the blue words to see the Festiniog Facebook pages showing these events.

Click here to visit the Wikipedia page for the Beeches Light Railway.

Click here for more pictures of the Carrabasset Parlor Car.

Update: 01-07-2016: for additional views of this car on another modellers’ site click here.

On2 Mounted Wheel Standards

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The picture above shows a selection of Maine Two Foot prototype wheelsets at the Sandy River Museum in the mid 1990’s.

In the following table, we show three different wheel standards compared to prototype dimensions derived from measurements of photographs and also a sample of measurements taken from commercial wheelsets. The ¼AAR for Two Foot Gauge – 1966 and the NMRA – 1974 Standards are included for historical purposes, as they reflect the standards in place when many of the brass locomotives and rolling stock were first produced.

Experience has shown that the back to back measurement of the wheels is most critical single dimension that affects the running of On2 trains through pointwork, and paradoxically this is also the dimension which is most likely to vary outside the control limits of the various specifications.

The table can be enlarged by clicking on it.

On2 wheel standards 2016-01

Notes

1/. Scaled from known object placed on central plane of wheelset.

2/. Scaled from track gauge with allowance for perspective.

3/. Measurements based on set of 4 wheelsets bought in the mid 1990’s. Measurement accuracy estimated at +/- .002 inches.

5/. By calculation.

7/. Back to back variation in a wheelset: three wheelsets had no measurable variation, one had .006” variation. This wheelset showed wobble on the insulated wheel.

8/. Back to back variation in a wheelset: all four wheelsets showed variations ranging from .002” to .005”. Three wheelsets showed wobble on the insulated wheel, one on the un-insulated wheelset.

9/. Back to back variation in a wheelset: one wheelset had no measurable variation, three wheelsets showed variations ranging from .002” to .003” and wobbled. Larger variations in measurement between set of four wheelsets, as expected by use of injection moulded axle with double shoulders. (Range of .018” versus .010” for NWSL and Portland Products).

10/. Back to back variation in a wheelset: wheelsets showed variations ranging from .003” to .024” and wobbled. Larger variations in measurement between set of four wheelsets, as expected by use of injection moulded axle with double shoulders. (Range of .027” versus .010” for NWSL and Portland Products).

Grandt Line Wheelsets.

The original Grandt Line On2 wheelsets consisted of metal rims with cast plastic centres featuring ribs on the back of the wheel and a moulded half axle outer profile with a steel functioning axle.

A later version was produced using the metal rims and cast centre only with a moulded plastic functioning axle. This combination can give problems with true running of the wheels, and most serious operators at the time chose to upgrade to NWSL wheelsets.

Grandt followed suit and supplied their freight truck with NWSL wheelsets. More recently Grandt has chosen to supply their freight truck without wheels.

Sample locomotive back to back wheel dimensions.

The following data was provided by Terry Smith from his own locomotives;-

Portland Products, F&M #1, from the front;-   .422 – .426 – .430 – .432

Putnam & Stowe, SR #2,     .417″

The Car Works, WW&FR #7, from the front;-   .417 – .4145 – .4205 – .4105 – .4105

The Car Works, B&SR #6, from the front;-   .410 – .412 – .4165 – .4115 – .4115

The Car Works, B&SR #7, from the front;-   .4025 – .4175 – .4135 – .408 – .4135

The Car Works, B&SR #8, from the front;-   .415 – .4165 – .422 – .413 – .413

Custom Brass, SR&RL #6 (1) , from the front;-   .4195 – .425 – .418 – .4165

Custom Brass, SR&RL #6 (2) , from the front;-   .420 – .421 – .421 – .419

Custom Brass, SR&RL #6 (3) , from the front;-   .424 – .421 – .415 – .4155

Custom Brass, SR&RL #6 (4) , from the front;-   .421 – .426 – .416 – .4155

Custom Brass, SR&RL #24,   .413″

 

Is “On2” P48, Proto 48 or Finescale? No, not according to current NMRA definitions or Standards. Click here for more details.

Updated 22 – May – 2016, 28 – May – 2016 and 20 – August – 2016.

Yikes! …we are three!

Is it really three years since we made our first tentative public disclosures of this blog?.

Yikes! ……….They say that time flies when you are enjoying yourself – or is it because as you get older your perception of elapsed time changes and that you have many more distractions?

Update added 03 – April -2016;-

The anniversary post has previously contained a quick review of the past year – this year the anniversary seemed to come round a lot quicker than previous years (hence the Yikes!), and then other circumstances conspired to prevent me posting the review portion on the anniversary – but here goes.

Around 20 posts/topics have been added in the last year, split fairly equally between Maine Two Foot prototype data, and On2 modelling topics. A few were re-publications of topics from the old HTML version of the FAQ’s, but the majority were new topics.

 We were fortunate to be given permission to publish Dwight Smith’s pictures of his visit to Bridgton in 1940, the announcement of which resulted in our biggest one day surge of viewers and viewings after Day 1 (our all time record, so far).

The blog receives a spike in the viewers and viewings when a new topic is posted and/or an old topic is referenced on the MaineOn2 Yahoo! group board, so it would seem that the blog is functioning to support the group as we and our founder intended.

 

We hope that you have enjoyed your visits, and thanks to all our contributors (and not forgetting the administrators),

Terry, Matt and Trevor.