What’s new? January 2015 version

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For a trial period, we have transferred the “What’s new?” listing to a post status in the main blog, in addition to it’s usual place as a separate page, so that all viewers can use the links provided to navigate to particular posts.

30-March-2015: “We are two!” posting published. Click here to view on another page

28-March-2015: “Train and Trooper – SR&RL Railcar #2″ post updated with link to prototype pictures. Click here to view on another page.

26-March-2015: “About these FAQ’s” page revised and updated.

26-March-2015: Original P:48 Layout plan added Bill Kerr’s SR&RL Layout posting and some text changes, click here to view

03-March-2015: Selected Chuck Collins Prototype locomotive information posts updated with pictures;-

Prototype Information: the Monson locomotives, click here to view
Prototype Information: the Bridgton locomotives, click here to view
Prototype Information: the SR&RL locomotives, click here to view.

02-March-2015: What are the Maine Two Footers? ;- updated with a heading picture and internal links to prototype locomotive information.

01-March-2015: WW&FR Structure Colours – colour picture and information provided by Chris McChesney added. Worth a visit!

01-March-2015: Structure Colours – “modern” examples, updated with two additional pictures.

25-February-2015: Structure Colours – “modern” examples, new posting published showing pictures of colour schemes applied to various Maine 2 foot railroad museum structures.

13-February-2015: Putnam & Stowe: the first domestic manufacturer posting updated with a section recording Maynard Stowe’s recollections of the enterprise and illustrated with a kit photograph.

08-February-2015: Editorial note 08-02-2015, “Password Protected” published in response to a comment………………………

22-January-2015: “What’s new?” listing copied to main page.

15-January-2015: Selected Chuck Collins Prototype locomotive information posts updated;-

Prototype Information: the B&B locomotives, click here to view.
Prototype Information: the F&M locomotives, click here to view.
Prototype Information: the SR locomotives, click here to view.
Prototype Information: the P&R locomotives, click here to view.
Prototype Information: the SR&RL locomotives, click here to view.

Small Forney Model locomotive posts updated;-

The Forney Co. F&M #1, click here to view.
Portland Products F&M #1, click here to view.
Portland Products SR #1, click here to view.
Putnam & Stowe SR #1, click here to view.
Putnam & Stowe SR #2, click here to view.

The Book list – part 6 – the SR&RL, click here to view

Portland Products – the second domestic manufacturer, click here to view.

01-January-2015: Top Posts for 2014: our end of year review of the posts registering the most views etc, now with links to those posts.

30-November-2014: Extra photographs added to Portland Products – the second domestic supplier and Portland Products F&M#1 locomotive. New posts The Forney Co. F&M#1 locomotive and Portland Products SR#1 locomotive added.

07-November-2014: Chuck Collins Prototype locomotive information introductory posting published, and the information posted under the following headings;-

Prototype Information: the Wiscasset locomotives, click here to view
Prototype Information: the Bridgton locomotives, click here to view
Prototype Information: the KC locomotives, click here to view
Prototype Information: the Monson locomotives, click here to view
Prototype Information: the B&B locomotives, click here to view
Prototype Information: the F&M locomotives, click here to view
Prototype Information: the SR locomotives, click here to view
Prototype Information: the P&R locomotives, click here to view
Prototype Information: the Eustis locomotives, click here to view
Prototype Information: the SR&RL locomotives, click here to view

28-October-2014: Layout plan added Bill Kerr’s SR&RL Layout posting, click here to view

09-June-2014: Bill Kerr’s SR&RL Layout revised with more pictures and text.

28-May-2014: Tin roofs – a temporary posting published as an extract from the previous FAQ’s  to support a thread on the MaineOn2 Yahoo! board, click here to view.

27-May-2014: SRCS Kits list: additional pictures of added. Click here to view.

25-May-2014: SRCS Kits list: more consistent nomenclature applied and revision date changed, plus additional pictures of assembled boxcar kits added.

23-May-2014: The Car Works – the second Importer: posting updated with additional pictures. Click here to view.

23-May-2014: SRCS Kits list Revision date: 18-May-2014 illustrated with pictures of a couple of assembled kits.

18-May-2014: SRCS Kits list Revision date: 18-May-2014 published as a WIP (work in progress) to support a thread on the MaineOn2 Yahoo! board.

05-May-2014: Ron King’s SR&RL Layout posting and a sidebar link added. Click here to view.

16-March-2014: We are one! Anniversary posting/announcement. Click here to view.

16-March-2014: SR&RL Locomotives re-numberings: original posting (SR&RL Locomotives re-numbering at time of amalgamation) updated with extra content about the numbering gaps at different times and title changed. Click here to view.

20-February-2014: Custom Brass SR&RL #6 post updated with Bob Schlechter’s pictures. Click here to view.

11-February-2014: Trevor Marshall’s S&PCRR layout post updated with an extra plan, text and links. Click here to view.

26-January-2014: Portland Products – the second domestic manufacturer: updated.

26-January-2014: “…with a little Yankee Ingenuity…” or Portland Products Parts: published.

25-January-2014: Happy New Year! message removed.

23-January-2014: What are the Maine Two Footers? ;- updated with a map reference showing all the lines.

12-January-2014: The Book list – Part 8 -The Compendia, updated.

08-January-2014: Passenger car models availability by prototype roadnames;- Monson; updated with photographs of assembled PLW kit.

05-January-2014: Top posts for 2013: published.

04-January-2014: Portland Products: posting updated with additional information.

04-January-2014: Couplers: On2 models posting updated (again!).

02-January-2014: Brakes posting updated with model pictures.

02-January-2014: Couplers: On2 models posting updated (2x).

Prototype Information: the SR&RL locomotives

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tssrlo01

The well travelled Portland locomotive, builders number 622, which served as Sandy River #5, Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #6, Kennebec Central  #4 and Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington #9, before being moved to Connecticut for more that 50 years. Shown here on it’s return to Maine at the WW&F Museum.

The following notes on individual locomotives were originally compiled (except where otherwise noted) and published by Chuck Collins, and are re-published here with his permission. The introduction, updates and formatting for this blog by Terry Smith. Updated 15-01-2015 and 03-03-2015.

The Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad 

The Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad was formed in January 1908 when the two major groups of shareholders owning the SR and F&M (one group) and the P&R, Madrid and Eustis (second group) agreed to merge. The locomotive and rolling stock fleets were merged and renumbered. The new company operated profitably and paid regular share and bond dividends.

In 1911 the SR&RL was acquired by the Maine Central Railroad on the direction of its parent company, the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad.

Under Maine Central control a number of older locomotives were scrapped or taken out of service and larger replacements were ordered from manufacturers. Track was upgraded, and starting 1915 the MeC rebuilt a number of the SR&RL loco’s with bigger boilers, etc, including enlarging a number of (2-6-0) Mogul types into larger (2-6-2) Prairies.

Further locomotive fleet improvements came later with the installation of air brakes and electric headlights.

In 1923 the SR&RL defaulted on some bonds and was then put into receivership. The court appointed former owners/shareholders Josiah Maxcy and Herbert Wing as receiver, and then the SR&RL took a long time dying, too long to tell here.

Finally after a number of cut backs, closures and re-starts Maxcy and Wing petitioned for closure and dispersal of assets in the Spring of 1935. This was granted and the final narrow gauge rail was removed from Farmington in late 1936.

SR&RL #1

Hinkley #1251 built 1877 as Billerica & Bedford Ariel.

12 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
30″ diameter 130psi boiler
8″x12″ cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank carried 400 gallons water and 1/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Billerica & Bedford #1 Ariel (1878 – 1879) as a strict cab forward Forney design.

Sandy River #1 Dawn (1879 – 1890) rebuilt as a conventional boiler first locomotive.

Rebuilt in 1882 with longer wheelbase, larger cab and water tank.

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #1 (1908 – 1912)

This was the first two foot gauge engine built for New England, and was virtually identical to Billerica and Bedford Puck built shortly thereafter. Built to run tank first. Purchased by Sandy River Railroad following dismantling of Billerica and Bedford Railroad. Rebuilt by the Hinkley Works in Boston in April 1879 as Sandy River Dawn #1 running boiler first and using wood fuel. Used as Sandy River Railroad construction engine beginning October 1879. Wrecked on plow train at Sandy River bridge south of Phillips 23 January 1882. Rebuilt March 1882 with longer wheelbase, larger cab, and tank capacity increased to 500 gallons. Became the preferred Sandy River engine following rebuilding. Used for passenger service following delivery of Sandy River #4 in October 1890. Reconverted to coal burning in 1893. Used as a standby engine following purchase of Sandy River 2nd #2 in 1893. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #1 in 1908 consolidation. Little used following purchase of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #9 in 1909. Scrapped September 1912 as Maine Central Railroad modernized subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes locomotive fleet.

SR&RL #2

Hinkley #1664 built 1/1884 as Franklin & Megantic #1 V.B.Mead.

14 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
32″130psi boiler
9×12 cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank held 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton wood.

This locomotive served as

Franklin & Megantic #1 (1884 – 1905)

Franklin & Megantic #2(2nd) (1905 -1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #2 (1908 – 1912)

This locomotive followed the pattern of Monson #1. Used as Franklin & Megantic construction engine beginning October 1884, and for Franklin & Megantic passenger service beginning 10 December 1884. Used as a standby engine following delivery of the former Laurel River & Hot Springs mogul in 1900. Renumbered Franklin & Megantic #2 in June 1905. Little used following purchase of Sandy River #16 in 1907. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #2 in the 1908 consolidation. Scrapped September 1912 as Maine Central Railroad modernized subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes locomotive fleet.

SR&RL #3

Baldwin #8304 built 12/1886 as Franklin & Megantic #2 S.W.Sargent.

16 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
38″ diameter 130psi boiler
9″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank held 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton wood.

This locomotive served as

Franklin & Megantic #2 (1st) (1886 – 1905)

Franklin & Megantic #3 (1905 -1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #3 (1908 – 1912)

This was the first Baldwin locomotive built for the Maine 2 foot gauge lines, and was the first to use the outside frames favored by Baldwin. It was the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine at the time of its delivery. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 5 tons per axle was a half ton greater than Hinkley’s Franklin & Megantic #1. Purchased as a freight engine to carry lumber produced by mills on the recently completed Mount Abram branch. Used as a standby engine following Josiah Maxcy’s purchase of the Franklin & Megantic railroad in 1898. Renumbered Franklin & Megantic #3 in June 1905. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #2 in the 1908 consolidation. Unused following completion of logging operations at Hammond Field. Scrapped September 1912 as Maine Central Railroad modernized subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes locomotive fleet.

SR&RL #4

Hinkley #1261 built 1877 as Billerica & Bedford Puck.

12 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
30″ diameter 130psi boiler
8″x12″ cylinders
30″ drivers
Rear tank carried 400 gallons water and 1/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Billerica & Bedford #2 Puck (1878 – 1879) as a strict cab forward Forney design.

Sandy River #2 Echo (1879 – 1890) rebuilt as a conventional boiler first locomotive.

Phillips & Rangeley #2 Bo Peep (1890 – 1893)

Phillips & Rangeley #4 Bo Peep (1893 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #4 (1908 – 1912)

This locomotive was a reorder of the Billerica and Bedford Ariel design to be used as a standby engine. Built to run tank first. Purchased by Sandy River Railroad following dismantling of Billerica and Bedford Railroad. Rebuilt by the Hinkley Works in Boston inApril 1879 as Sandy River Echo #2 running boiler first and using wood fuel. Used as Sandy River construction engine beginning 25 September 1879. Pulled the first passenger train to Strong 12 November 1879. Sold to Phillips and Rangeley Railroad as P&R #2 Bo Peep in July 1890 and used as Phillips and Rangeley construction engine. Renumbered Phillips & Rangeley #4 and used as a standby engine following purchase of Phillips & Rangeley 2nd #2 in 1893. Used for summer only passenger service between Rangeley and Green Farm upon completion of the Eustis Railroad in 1904. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #4 in 1908, but little used following discontinuance of Eustis branch passenger service in same year. Scrapped September 1912 as Maine Central Railroad modernized subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes locomotive fleet.

SR&RL #5

Portland #616 built 10/1890 as Sandy River #4.

18 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
34″ diameter 140psi boiler
10.5″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank carried 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #4 (1890 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #5 (1908 – 1919).

This engine was built in a joint order with Phillips and Rangeley #1. The two engines reflected Portland Company’s initial modification of the Hinkley design. This engine was ordered to replace Sandy River #2 when that engine was sold to the Phillips and Rangeley. Used as the Sandy River freight engine until Sandy River #5 was delivered in May 1891. Then assigned to passenger service including the Rangeley Express. Burned in Phillips 19 June 1897 engine house fire. Derailed by ice and overturned on a Phillips & Rangeley plow train between Dallas and Dead River Station on 21 January 1903 with Dana Aldrich as engineer. Derailed by excessive speed and rolled over with the southbound Rangeley Express north of Strong on 8 September 1906. Used as a standby passenger engine following delivery of Sandy River #16 in 1907. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #5 in 1908 consolidation. Derailed and rolled over with passenger train near Carrabasset 26 October 1913. Little used following purchase of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #10 in 1916. Scrapped when Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #24 was delivered in 1919.

SR&RL #6

Portland #622 built 5/1891 as Sandy River #5 N. B. Beal.

18 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
34″ diameter 140psi boiler
10.5″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank carried 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #5 (1890 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #6 (1908 – 1925).

Kennebec Central as KC #4 (1908 – 1925).

Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington #9 (1908 – 1925).

Currently at the WW&F Museum.

This engine was a repeat order for the design of Sandy River #4. Purchased to handle lumber traffic being produced by mills on the newly completed Phillips and Rangeley Railroad. Used as the Sandy River freight engine until Sandy River 2nd #2 was delivered in September 1893. Overturned at Strong in December 1892, and repaired with a new cab January 1893. Burned in Phillips 19 June 1897 engine house fire. Engineer Will Barker was killed when this engine was hit and overturned by a standard gauge engine at the Farmington diamond on 20 December 1897. Used as the Franklin & Megantic freight engine from completion of repairs in February 1898 until the former Laurel River & Hot Springs mogul was purchased in February, 1900. Then used as the Franklin and Megantic passenger engine. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #6 in 1908. Overturned with passenger train south of Salem Summit 23 January 1917. Electric headlight installed 13 December 1921. Sold to the Kennebec Central as KC #4 in 1925 and used as their standby engine until discontinuance of service in 1929. Purchased by Frank Winter and moved to Wiscasset in 1932. Renumbered Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington #9 and used as the standby engine until discontinuance of service on the Wiscasset, Waterville and Farmington in 1933. Purchased by a railfan and moved to Connecticut in 1937.

SR&RL #7

Portland #615 built 10/1890 as Phillips and Rangeley #1 Calvin Putnam.

18 ton inside frame 0-4-4RT
34″ diameter 140psi boiler
10.5″x14″ cylinders
33″ drivers
Rear tank held 600 gallons water & 3/4 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #1 (1890 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #7 (1908 – 1935)

This engine was built in a joint order with Sandy River #4. The two engines reflected Portland Company’s execution of the pattern purchased from the defunct Hinkley Locomotive Works. This locomotive was 20% heavier than the engines Hinkley had built for the Bridgton & Saco River, Franklin & Megantic, and Monson railroads. It was the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine at the time of its delivery. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 5.5 tons per axle was a full ton greater than the Hinkley design. This Portland design proved to be the most successful and enduring for the Maine 2 foot gauge railroads. Forty years later, locomotives of this design pulled the final trains on the Kennebec Central, Monson, and Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington railroads. This engine was assigned to Phillips & Rangeley passenger service including through trains over the Sandy River during summer months. The original Portland cab was damaged in 1904 and replaced by a less ornate Baldwin style cab. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #7 in 1908 and used as a standby passenger engine following delivery of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #9 in 1909. Derailed at a washout between Kingfield and Salem on 15 April 1912. Rolled over with passenger train during low speed collision with another train at Strong on 8 July 1916. Little used following purchase of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #24 in 1919. Stored outdoors in 1923 and scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

SR&RL #8

Baldwin #31826 built 9/1907 as Sandy River #16.

Configuration:
28 ton inside frame 2-4-4RT
41″ diameter 180psi boiler
11.5″x14″ cylinders
35″ drivers
Rear tank carried 800 gallons water & 1.5 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #16 (1907 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #8 (1908 – 1935).

This was one of a pair of engines built to Bridgton master mechanic Mel Caswell’s specification for inside frames. The other was Bridgton and Saco River #6. These were the largest Maine 2 foot gauge engines built with inside frames, and the only inside frame engines Baldwin built for the Maine 2 foot gauge railroads. Sandy River’s next order to Baldwin, after a year of experience with this engine, was for an identical engine with outside frames. Purchased to replace the Portland Forneys with more power for the Rangeley Express. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #8 in 1908. Engineer Frank Hodgman was killed when this engine left the rails and tipped over at Fairbanks while pulling the 11 August 1917 Rangeley Express northbound. Used as a standby engine for low speed work following that wreck. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Burned in the 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. Not repaired and scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

SR&RL #9

Baldwin #33550 built 7/1909 as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #9.

Configuration: 28 ton outside frame 2-4-4RT
41″ diameter 180psi boiler
11.5″x14″ cylinders
35″ drivers
Rear tank carried 800 gallons water & 1.2 tons coal.

This locomotive served as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #9 (1909 – 1936).
This engine repeated the design of Sandy River #16 but specified outside frames following experience with the instability of the earlier engine. Purchased to replace the Portland Forneys with more power for the Rangeley Express and became the preferred passenger engine. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Fitted with air brakes in1920. Used in mixed train service during receivership. Was the standby engine during dismantling of the Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad, and was scrapped at Farmington in 1936.

SR&RL #10

Baldwin #44231 built 10/1916 as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #10.

33 ton outside frame 2-4-4RT
43″ diameter 180psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
36″ drivers
Rear tank carried 1000 gallons water & 1.5 tons coal.

This locomotive served as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #10 (1916 – 1936).

This engine was a repetition of Bridgton master mechanic Mel Caswell’s Bridgton & Saco River #7 design to test applicability of Bridgton & Saco River railroad experience to conditions on the Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad. This was the heaviest engine to operate on the Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad. Weight was destructive on the 35 pound rails north of Phillips and contributed to subsequent abandonment of service over the former Phillips & Rangeley. Never used on the former Franklin & Megantic line to Kingfield or Carrabasset. Burned in the 3 October 1917 Rangeley engine house fire. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Became the preferred engine for mixed trains on the heavy rail main line from Phillips to Farmington until service was discontinued in 1935. Derailed 5 miles north of Farmington on 26 December 1929 in the last wreck on the Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad. Scrapped in 1936.

SR&RL #15

Baldwin #11706 built 3/1891 as Phillips & Rangeley #3 George M. Goodwin.

Configuration: 23 ton outside frame 2-6-0
42″ diameter 130psi boiler
13″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
15 ton tender held 1200 gallons water & 2 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #3 (1891 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #15 (1908 – 1935)

Rebuilt as a Prairie locomotive in 1912.

Phillips & Rangeley Railroad had again taken delivery of the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 6.3 tons per axle was 20% greater than Portland’s Phillips & Rangeley #1. The engine alone was 30% heavier than Phillips & Rangeley #1 and it was the first locomotive with a separate tender on the Maine two foot gauge railroads. Observation of its performance provided basis for the improved design later built for Laurel River & Hot Springs. Purchased to handle lumber traffic produced by the Redington sawmill. Used as the preferred Phillips & Rangeley freight engine. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #15 in 1908. Rebuilt in 1912 by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops as a 25 ton 2-6-2 with a 42″ diameter 180 PSI boiler, 12.5×16 inch cylinders, and a 19 ton tender. This was the first engine rebuilt by Maine Central, and results were observed and applied to future Mogul conversions. Boiler steam capacity was still inadequate for 12.5″ diameter cylinders. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Used in general freight service until it broke a driver axle 12 February 1923. Never repaired. Scrapped in 1935

SR&RL #16

Baldwin #12964 built 10/1892 as Laurel River & Hot Springs James Wyman.

20 ton outside frame 2-6-0
38″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
13 ton tender carried 700 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Laurel River & Hot Springs James Wyman (1892)

Sandy River #3 (2nd) (1900 – 1905).

Sandy River #6 (1905 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #16 (1908 – 1936)

Substantially rebuilt as a Prairie locomotive in 1915.

This improved Mogul design was based on observation of Phillips & Rangeley #3. The North Carolina lumber operation for which it was built failed within a few months, and the engine was brought to Wiscasset on 20 January 1897. The engine was put in storage in Portland when the Wiscasset & Quebec Railroad was unable to pay for it. Built with air brakes and became the first Maine 2 foot gauge engine so equipped. Delivered to the Sandy River railroad in February 1900. Renumbered Sandy River 2nd #3 and became the preferred freight engine on Sandy River subsidiary Franklin & Megantic Railroad. Overturned in switching test by Orris Vose at Salem Summit on 29 October 1900. Derailed on a plow train at Salem Flat on 8 February 1901. Renumbered Sandy River #6 in June 1905. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #16 in 1908. Rebuilt October 1915 by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops adding a trailing truck to support a larger boiler, and a proportionally larger tender was provided similar to the original design of Sandy River #8. Subsequently used system wide in freight and mixed service. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Burned in 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. After completion of repairs rolled over during low speed collision with Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #23 at Phillips in 1924. Unused after 1932. Scrapped during dismantling of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad in 1935.

SR&RL #17

Baldwin #13276 built 3/1893 as Phillips & Rangeley second #2.

Configuration: 26 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
38″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
35″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Phillips & Rangeley #2 (2nd) (1893 – 1908)

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #17 (1908 – 1936)

For the third time in as many purchases, Phillips & Rangeley Railroad ordered what became the largest 2 foot gauge locomotive in Maine. The design similarly represented the heaviest driver axle loading to date. Loading of 9 tons per axle was twice the loading of the Hinkley engines and almost 50% greater than Phillips & Rangeley #3. This engine similarly doubled the weight of the Hinkley design. Pulling power was similar to Phillips & Rangeley #3 mogul, but the absence of a separate tender made backing easier where no turntable was available. Sloshing water in partially filled leading tenders was subsequently blamed for several derailments on the rough track of logging branches. Phillips & Rangeley #2 proved well suited to branch line logging operations. Phillips & Rangeley management considered axle loading damage to track insignificant over the short useful life of logging branches. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #17 in 1908. Reboilered by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops in February 1915. The new 40″ diameter 180 PSI boiler increased engine weight to 28 tons and axle loading to 10 tons. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in December 1919. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used as a standby engine until the railroad was dismantled in 1935. Scrapped in 1936.

SR&RL #18

Baldwin #13733 built 9/1893 as Sandy River 2nd #2.

20 ton outside frame 2-6-0
36″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
13 ton tender carried 1000 gallons water & 1.5 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #2 (2nd) (1893 – 1905).

Sandy River #7 (1905 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #18 (1908 – 1936)

Substantially rebuilt as a Prairie locomotive in 1916.

This was a repeat of the Laurel River & Hot Springs Mogul design. Purchased to handle increasing volumes of lumber being received from Philips & Rangeley and Franklin & Megantic railroads. Used as the preferred Sandy River freight engine until delivery of Sandy River #8 in 1904. Then used as a standby freight engine. Renumbered Sandy River #7 in June 1905. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #18 in 1908. Rebuilt January 1916 by Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops adding a trailing truck to support a larger boiler, and a proportionally larger tender was provided similar to the original design of Sandy River #8, and identical to the recently completed conversion of Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #16. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Subsequently used system wide in freight and mixed service. Wrecked when Kingfield bridge collapsed on 29 May 1922. Burned in 12 February 1923 Phillips enginehouse fire. Repaired, and received a new tender built by Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1926. Used as a standby engine during receivership. Pulled the Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes scrapping train in 1936. Scrapped at Farmington when dismantling was complete.

SR&RL #19

Baldwin #23874 built 3/1904 as Sandy River #8.

25 ton outside frame 2-6-2
40″ diameter 180psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
19 ton tender carried 1500 gallons water & 2 tons coal.

This locomotive served as

Sandy River #8 (1904 – 1908).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #19 (1908 – 1935).

This engine was the first Prairie type on the Maine two foot gauge railroads. A larger boiler was supported by adding a trailing truck to the frame designed for the Laurel River & Hot Springs Mogul, and a proportionally larger tender was provided. Purchased to handle lumber traffic produced by new sawmills at Madrid and Bigelow. Used as the preferred freight engine on the Phillips to Farmington main line until Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #23 delivered in 1913. Then used system wide. Wrecked north of Strong on 22 March 1907. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #19 in 1908. Fitted with air brakes and electric headlight in 1919. Burned in 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. Repaired, but unused after 1932. Scrapped in 1935.

SR&RL #20

Baldwin #23245 built 11/1903 as Eustis #7.

Configuration: 28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #7 (1903-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #20 (1911 – 1936).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the first of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #20 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in 1917. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Used as a standby engine until damaged in a wreck on 22 November 1922. Thereafter stored outdoors unrepaired and scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

SR&RL #21

Baldwin #23754 built 2/1904 as Eustis #8.
Configuration:
28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.
This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #8 (1904-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #21 (1911 – 1935).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the second of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #21 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in June 1917. Burned in the 3 October 1917 Rangeley engine house fire. Fitted with electric headlight in December 1920. Burned in the 12 February 1923 Phillips engine house fire. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used sparingly as a standby engine until it broke a driver axle in 1932. Scrapped when the railroad was dismantled in 1935.

SR&RL #22

Baldwin #23755 built 2/1904 as Eustis #9.

Configuration: 28 ton outside frame 0-4-4RT
42″ diameter 140psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
32″ drivers
Rear tank held 800 gallons water & 1 ton coal.

This locomotive served as

Eustis Railroad #9 (1904-1911).

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #22 (1911 – 1935).

This engine was a modernized repetition of the design used for Phillips & Rangeley #2. It was the third of a three engine order purchased to pull trainloads of logs from the Eustis branch to the Berlin Mills sawmill at Madrid. Renumbered Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #22 in August 1911. Fitted with air brakes in 1917. Fitted with electric headlight in 1920. Struck an automobile near Rangeley on 17 September 1920 in the only documented grade crossing fatality of the Maine 2 foot gauge railroads. Burned in the 12 February 1923 Phillips enginehouse fire. The heavy axle loading was destructive on 35 pound rails and discouraged use of this engine over the former Franklin & Megantic and Phillips & Rangeley after track maintenance was reduced during receivership. Used sparingly as a standby engine. Stored outdoors at Phillips following abandonment of service to Rangeley. Scrapped in 1935.

SR&RL #23

These notes were originally compiled by Al Wellman.

Baldwin #40733 built 10/1913 as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #23.
Configuration:
32 ton outside frame 2-6-2
48″ diameter 180psi boiler
13″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
22 ton tender carried 2000 gallons water & 3 tons coal.

This locomotive served as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #23 (1913 – 1936).

This design was Maine Central Railroad’s attempt to increase the pulling capacity of its subsidiary Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes freight engines. Although axle loading was increased beyond the capacity of widely used 35 pound rail, full throttle power under load initiated wheel slip. The design was not repeated, and subsequent Prairie type #24 reverted to the weight and power characteristics of 1904 design Sandy River #8. Purchased to replace 4 pre-1890 Forneys scrapped in 1912. Used exclusively for freight and snow trains on the heavy rail main line from Phillips to Farmington. Fitted with electric headlight in 1919. Not used after 1932. Scrapped in 1936.

SR&RL #24

Baldwin #51804 built 5/1919 as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #24.

27 ton outside frame 2-6-2
42″ diameter 180psi boiler
12″x16″ cylinders
33″ drivers
22 ton tender carried 2000 gallons water & 3 tons coal.

This locomotive served as Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes #24 (1919 – 1937).

This engine was a modernized repetition of Sandy River #8. Purchased for general freight service during peak pulpwood cutting for First World War paper contracts. Wrecked on the Madrid branch on 10 July 1919. Tender then rebuilt at Maine Central Railroad Waterville shops in October 1919 to reduce width and improve stability. Wrecked on a plow train near Madrid station on 11 March 1920. During receivership became the preferred mixed freight engine on the former Franklin & Megantic — and, following abandonment of the former Phillips & Rangeley in 1932, system wide during summer months. Purchased by a railfan when Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes railroad was dismantled in 1936. Scrapped in 1937.

 

We are two!

It is two years ago since we took the plunge to make our first tentative public disclosures of this blog, so we are counting today as the second “official” birthday.

We started back then with just 36 topics/posts, mostly picture based and showing historic On2 layouts and what brass models had been produced commercially.

By the first anniversary, the number of topics had grown to 110+, with the addition of prototype information, book lists, historic plan lists and the stories of a number of suppliers.

Our second “birthday” today, the number of published topics has risen to 144 (with this posting). The second year has really been about consolidation; we were fortunate to permission from Chuck Collins to reproduce his prototype locomotive information previously published on his now defunct website, and to receive input from both Maynard Stowe and Mark Hall about their work in producing the Putnam & Stowe and The Forney Co/Portland Products 0-4-4T Forney locomotives respectively. We also received further photographs of Bill Kerr’s home layout, which allowed us to significantly add to this already popular posting.

Our blog engine, WordPress, introduced changes over the last year; one which will be familiar to our returning viewers is the ability to make a posting “sticky”; ie give it priority so that it appears at the top of the list. We use this facility to bring the older posts back to the top of the list in rotation, and also when an old post has been significantly changed. Viewers will see this facility as a “Featured” post.

A year ago, in response to a comment about what we were trying to do with the blog, we wrote;-

After much discussion, we decided that the best description of what we are attempting to do with the new blog style FAQ’s is “to produce/publish an internet based resource for the Maine On2 modeller (and Maine Two Foot enthusiast) that tries to address the common questions, problems and solutions which would otherwise be buried deep within the various Yahoo! Groups, and to make these freely available.”

 Looking back now, we feel that we can now say that we are further along that road.

Thanks to all our contributors (and administrators),

Terry, Matt and Trevor.

 

 

 

 

Structure Colours – “modern” examples

Updated 01-03-2015: The subject of what colour to paint (or stain) our model buildings or structures is fraught with many difficulties, but to aid a current discussion thread on the Maine On2 Yahoo! group, I am publishing a few of my own colour photographs of what I would call “modern” examples of colour schemes.

Please note that these examples are not intended to be specific and accurate colour renditions of paint schemes used by the Maine Two Footers. My hope is that they may encourage blog readers and Yahoo! group members to share what paints they use for their models.

The original photographs were taken on film in the 1980’s and 1990’s during my then frequent travel to the USA. The same film (probably Kodachrome 200) was used in the same camera (auto exposure with override), and the pictures have all been scanned recently using the same scanner and software. Whilst the colours may be wrong, my assumption is that they will be consistently wrong.

tssco7This shot shows the Edaville depot and restaurant in the familiar 1980’s Edaville colour scheme, which is believed to be similar to the old Boston and Maine colour scheme.

tssco6

This picture was taken at the Wiscasset Museum sometime in the 1990’s, and shows the re-built and re-painted Sheepscot Station. I believe that the structure now sports a different colour scheme. It is open to debate and confirmation as to whether this was an attempt at the original W&Q colour scheme. Chris McChesney has commented;- I would say that the “Buff and Brown” scheme might have been based on the common conception in the 1970s and 80s, but this has not been confirmed from actual paint samples from remaining W&Q or WW&F structures.

tssco5

The next series of pictures were taken at the Boothbay Museum in one of the summers in the mid 1990’s when the various rail busses and rail cars visited. The Boothbay structures were painted in a two tone green scheme, somewhat reminiscent of the Grey (Gray) and Dark Green Maine Central “Pond Bottom” colour scheme applied to both the SR&RL and B&SR when these Two Footers were controlled by the MeC. The Wiscasset line also applied a similar two toned scheme using Light Green and Dark Green. Chris McChesney writes;-  The Dark Green on the WW&F was a little lighter than the Dark Green on the MEC/SR&RL/B&SR. The MEC Dark Green was actually pretty dark and there are several original structures in original Dark Green to prove this.

 

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Shows the Boothbay structure colour scheme  in the shade – and an over-heating rail bus!

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Shows the Boothbay structure colour scheme in bright daylight (in the distance)

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These two shots show the Sandy River Museum and their structure colour scheme, again on a summers’ day in the 1990’s. Presumably, this is another attempt at the Maine Central “Pond Bottom” colour scheme.

tssco1

The following two pictures were taken at the Conway Scenic Railway at North Conway, NH – a favourite journey break place for me in my travels initially for the model shop that used to be in the block of shops to the right of the first picture and later to indulge in a treat of Ben and Jerry’s ice cream, ideally sat on their patio overlooking the yard – close to my idea of heaven – watching trains and eating Ben and Jerry’s!

tssco09

 

tssco10

This picture has been included because it shows three different appearances of colour schemes, note the differences between the crossing shanty, the freight shed in the distance behind it and the loco shed to the left. Sort of confirms the opening comment of how difficult it is to describe colours and colour schemes………more anon…….stay tuned!

Discussions are welcomed on any subject to do with this posting, apart from the spelling of colour.

 

Editorial note 08-02-2015, “Password Protected”

The editors need to share a post, currently under development, with a key contributor to ensure accuracy and correct attributions.

It would appear that the simplest route to do this, is to issue the draft under password protection so that only the key contributor and the editors can see the full draft in the blog format.

Public viewers will see the working title of the post and the phrase “password protected”. Please do not ask for the password, or make any comments. Your patience will be rewarded by the publication of the checked and corrected post in due course,

MOF

 

 

 

 

 

Top posts for 2014

Traditionally, the New Year has always been a time for reflection about the past year and how things went in the past year. WordPress has already sent me the end of year statistics, so here are our top posts for the past year;-

#1 – MaineOn2 layouts – Bill Kerr’s SR&RL: quite a fitting tribute to our founder, and way out in front. Placed 5th in 2013 Top Posts.

#2 -SR&RL; Historic list of plans

#3 -SRCS O scale kits list – a Work In Progress; published 18th May 2014.

#4 – “…with a little Yankee Ingenuity…” or Portland Products Parts; published 24th January 2014.

#5 – Custom Brass – SR&RL Locomotive #20/21/22.

#6 – Custom Brass – SR&RL Locomotive #6:  – a well liked and versatile model and prototype. Also placed 6th in 2013 Top Posts.

A rather different listing for this year compared to last year, and one which essentially pays tribute to some of the people who have significantly helped the Maine On2 Modeller;-

Bill Kerr was the editor, publisher and chief compiler of the original web page version of these FAQ’s, as well as an outstanding scenery modeller, and sometime Moderator of the Yahoo! Maine On2 and Maine Two Footer groups. A number of contributors sent us more photographs and other information this year allowing us to update his layout posting twice, firstly with additional photographs in the correct layout sequence and secondly with a layout plan.

The third most popular post shows a listing from the 1989 period of the SRCS (Sandy River Car Shops) kits produced by Peter Barney. These kits were the mainstay of the hobby for most On2 modellers of the 1980’s and 1990’s. Peter is well known as the founder of SRCS, a prolific author on the Maine Two Footers and has penned numerous modelling articles in addition to filling his basement with various On2 models and layouts.

The fourth most popular post shows part of a catalogue, from the mid 1980’s period, of the Portland Products parts and kits produced by Bob Werner of the Hobby Barn. Bob was well known as a producer of cast brass parts and etchings to support the modelling of the Maine Two Footers in both O and HO scales. Bob was an enthusiastic supporter of Edaville and a noted historian of the Maine Two Footers, and has numerous credits to his name in other authors’ books for furnishing photographs and equipment rosters.

In these FAQ’s, Bob actually has four posts (“…with a little Yankee Ingenuity…” , Portland Products – the second domestic manufacturer, Portland Products – SR#1 locomotive and Portland Products – F&M locomotive #1) to his name, and if the total viewings were aggregated then Bob would be in second place this year.

Comparing 2014 with the 8 months of 2013 then we have had double the number of visitors and a 50% increase in the number of viewings.

The nationality of viewers is pretty stable, with some 75% of the viewings being made from the USA, with the United Kingdom in second place with some 6% and Canada in a very close third with 4%. In total, the blog has recorded viewers from 61 different countries around the globe this year.

We hope that our viewers have found the site of interest over the last year. We have more topics and content in-process and some fairly major revisions are planned, so keep coming back in the coming year.

To view the top posts directly click on the titles below which will open the posts in another page;-

#1 – MaineOn2 layouts – Bill Kerr’s SR&RL;

#2 -SR&RL; Historic list of plans;

#3 -SRCS O scale kits list – a Work In Progress;

#4 – “…with a little Yankee Ingenuity…” or Portland Products Parts;

Portland Products – the second domestic manufacturer,

Portland Products – SR#1 locomotive

Portland Products – F&M locomotive #1

#5 – Custom Brass – SR&RL Locomotive #20/21/22;

#6 – Custom Brass – SR&RL Locomotive #6;

…..and enjoy your trains and browsing in 2015.