Track Schematics – the Wiscasset line

This series of track schematics were produced by Trevor Marshall in 2007 as part of his mid-term re-design for his On2 Somerset & Piscataquis Counties RR layout, and were originally published on the groups Fotopic site. Trevor drew them up to enhance his understanding of the operations of the smaller Maine Two Footers and to demonstrate the relative simplicity of their facilities. They are not to scale and where the track work changed over time, they generally represent the largest variant. Note that the original intent of these track schematics was as model railroad LDE’s (Layout Design Elements) rather than as historically or prototypically correct representations.

Click here to view Trevor Marshall’s On2 Somerset & Piscataquis Counties RR layouts on another page.

The Wiscasset line operated from 1895 until 1933 between the Maine towns of Wiscasset, Albion, and Winslow, but was abandoned in 1936.

The line began operating to Weeks Mills on February 20, 1895, as the Wiscasset and Quebec Railroad. The line was reorganized in 1901 as the Wiscasset, Waterville and Farmington Railway, and completed a branch line from Weeks Mills to the Kennebec River at Winslow intending but failing to connect with the Sandy River Railroad at Farmington. This branch line operated from 1902 to 1916 before it was abandoned.

WWF-01-WiscassetLowerc

The Lower Yard was around milepost minus 1

WWF-02-WiscassetCrossingc

This station was milepost 0.0.

WWF-03-WiscassettUpperc

The Upper Yard was around milepost 1

WWF-04-Sheepscotc

Milepost 4.8

WWF-05-TopMountainc

Top of the Mountain was around milepost 6.

WWF-06-HeadTidec

Milepost 9.1

WWF-07-HeadTidePitc

Head Tide Pit was around milepost 10.5

WWF-08-Whitefieldc

Milepost 13.3

WWF-09-NorthWhitefieldc

Milepost 17.4

WWF-10-CoopersMillsc

Milepost 20.4

WWF-11-Maxcysc

Milepost 20.4

WWF-12-Windsorc

Milepost 23.0

WWF-13-WeeksMillsc

Weeks Mills was at Milepost 28.2

WWF-14-Newellsc

Milepost 31.0

WWF-15-Palermoc

Milepost 32.9

WWF-16-Chinac

Milepost 38.0

WWF-17-Albionc

Milepost 43.5

The branch line to Winslow was built in 1901 as an ill fated attempt to connect with the Sandy River Railroad at Farmington, but only reached the Kennebec River at Winslow. The branch operated from 1902 until 1916 before it was abandoned.

WWF-18-SouthChinac

Milepost 31.5

WWF-19-EastVassalboroc

Milepost 36.5

WWF-20-NorthVassalboroc

Milepost 39.1

WWF-21-Winslowc

Milepost 42.7

 

Track Schematics – the Bridgton line

This series of track schematics were produced by Trevor Marshall in 2007 as part of his mid-term re-design for his On2 Somerset & Piscataquis Counties RR layout, and were originally published on the groups Fotopic site. Trevor drew them up to enhance his understanding of the operations of the smaller Maine Two Footers and to demonstrate the relative simplicity of their facilities. They are not to scale and where the track work changed over time, they generally represent the largest variant. Note that the original intent of these track schematics was as model railroad LDE’s (Layout Design Elements) rather than as historically or prototypically correct representations.

Click here to view Trevor Marshall’s On2 Somerset & Piscataquis Counties RR layouts on another page.

The line was built as the Bridgton & Saco River Railroad in 1882 from Bridgton Junction to Bridgton (town) a distance of nearly 16 miles, and the first paying train ran in January 1883. In 1898 the line was extended from Bridgton to Harrison, a distance of 5 miles or so.

In 1930 after some financial troubles the line was formally transferred to a group of local parties, and was renamed The Bridgton & Harrison railroad. It is ironic that the first train operating under this regime then derailed on its return from Harrison, which caused the Harrison extension to be abandoned.

The line was finally scrapped in 1941 with the majority of the rolling stock being acquired by a wealthy railfan and cranberry grower, Ellis D Atwood, for use on his cranberry bogs in South Carver, Massachusetts.

BSR-01-BridgtonJctc

Milepost 0.0

BSR-02-Scribnersc

Milepost 0.8

BSR-03-Mullensc

Milepost 2.7

BSR-04-GravelPitc

Milepost 5.3

BSR-05-WestSebagoc

Milepost 7.3

BSR-06-TankHouseSidingc

Milepost 7.6

BSR-07-PerleysMillsc

Milepost 9.0

BSR-08-IngallsRoadc

Milepost 10.5

BSR-09-Kennittsc

Milepost 11.3, note alternative spellings of “Kennetts” and “Kennet’s” used by the Maine Central.

BSR-10-SouthBridgtonc

Milepost 12.1

BSR-11-SandyCreekc

Milepost 13.6

BSR-12-Bridgtonc

Milepost 15.9. In 1898 the line was extended from Bridgton to Harrison, a distance of 5 miles or so. The extension was abandoned in 1930. Location of one of the very few 2 foot diamond crossings.

BSR-13-FarmersMarketc

Milepost 16.0, also known as “Farmers Exchange”.

BSR-14-ForestMillsc

Milepost 16.4

BSR-15-NorthBridgtonc

Milepost 19.5

BSR-16-Harrisonc

Milepost 20.8, the end.

 

Track Schematics – The Kennebec Central

This series of track schematics were produced by Trevor Marshall in 2007 as part of his mid-term re-design for his On2 Somerset & Piscataquis Counties RR layout, and were originally published on the groups Fotopic site. Trevor drew them up to enhance his understanding of the operations of the smaller Maine Two Footers and to demonstrate the relative simplicity of their facilities. They are not to scale and where the track work changed over time, they generally represent the largest variant. Note that the original intent of these track schematics was as model railroad LDE’s (Layout Design Elements) rather than as historically or prototypically correct representations.

Click here to view Trevor Marshall’s On2 Somerset & Piscataquis Counties RR layouts on another page.

 

KCRR-01-Randolphc

The Kennebec Central was another simple line, running the five miles from a terminus on the riverside at Randolph (above) to the National Soldier’s Home at Togus (below).

KCRR-02-Togusc

Track Schematics – the Monson

This series of track schematics were produced by Trevor Marshall in 2007 as part of his mid-term re-design for his On2 Somerset & Piscataquis Counties RR layout, and were originally published on the groups Fotopic site. Trevor drew them up to enhance his understanding of the operations of the smaller Maine Two Footers and to demonstrate the relative simplicity of their facilities. They are not to scale and where the track work changed over time, they generally represent the largest variant. Note that the original intent of these track schematics was as model railroad LDE’s (Layout Design Elements) rather than as historically or prototypically correct representations.

Click here to view Trevor Marshall’s On2 Somerset & Piscataquis Counties RR layouts on another page.

 

MRR-01-MonsonJctc

The Monson was a pretty simple line running the six miles from Monson Village (below) and the slate quarries beyond to Monson Junction (above) where it interchanged with the Bangor & Aroostook Railroad.

MRR-02-Monsonc

We are two!

It is two years ago since we took the plunge to make our first tentative public disclosures of this blog, so we are counting today as the second “official” birthday.

We started back then with just 36 topics/posts, mostly picture based and showing historic On2 layouts and what brass models had been produced commercially.

By the first anniversary, the number of topics had grown to 110+, with the addition of prototype information, book lists, historic plan lists and the stories of a number of suppliers.

Our second “birthday” today, the number of published topics has risen to 144 (with this posting). The second year has really been about consolidation; we were fortunate to receive permission from Chuck Collins to reproduce his prototype locomotive information previously published on his now defunct website, and to receive input from both Maynard Stowe and Mark Hall about their work in producing the Putnam & Stowe and The Forney Co/Portland Products 0-4-4T Forney locomotives respectively. We also received further photographs of Bill Kerr’s home layout, which allowed us to significantly add to this already popular posting.

Our blog engine, WordPress, introduced changes over the last year; one which will be familiar to our returning viewers is the ability to make a posting “sticky”; ie give it priority so that it appears at the top of the list. We use this facility to bring the older posts back to the top of the list in rotation, and also when an old post has been significantly changed. Viewers will see this facility as a “Featured” post.

A year ago, in response to a comment about what we were trying to do with the blog, we wrote;-

After much discussion, we decided that the best description of what we are attempting to do with the new blog style FAQ’s is “to produce/publish an internet based resource for the Maine On2 modeller (and Maine Two Foot enthusiast) that tries to address the common questions, problems and solutions which would otherwise be buried deep within the various Yahoo! Groups, and to make these freely available.”

 Looking back now, we feel that we can now say that we are further along that road.

Thanks to all our contributors (and administrators),

Terry, Matt and Trevor.

 

 

 

 

Structure Colours – “modern” examples

Updated 01-03-2015: The subject of what colour to paint (or stain) our model buildings or structures is fraught with many difficulties, but to aid a current discussion thread on the Maine On2 Yahoo! group, I am publishing a few of my own colour photographs of what I would call “modern” examples of colour schemes.

Please note that these examples are not intended to be specific and accurate colour renditions of paint schemes used by the Maine Two Footers. My hope is that they may encourage blog readers and Yahoo! group members to share what paints they use for their models.

The original photographs were taken on film in the 1980’s and 1990’s during my then frequent travel to the USA. The same film (probably Kodachrome 200) was used in the same camera (auto exposure with override), and the pictures have all been scanned recently using the same scanner and software. Whilst the colours may be wrong, my assumption is that they will be consistently wrong.

tssco7This shot shows the Edaville depot and restaurant in the familiar 1980’s Edaville colour scheme, which is believed to be similar to the old Boston and Maine colour scheme.

tssco6

This picture was taken at the Wiscasset Museum sometime in the 1990’s, and shows the re-built and re-painted Sheepscot Station. I believe that the structure now sports a different colour scheme. It is open to debate and confirmation as to whether this was an attempt at the original W&Q colour scheme. Chris McChesney has commented;- I would say that the “Buff and Brown” scheme might have been based on the common conception in the 1970s and 80s, but this has not been confirmed from actual paint samples from remaining W&Q or WW&F structures.

tssco5

The next series of pictures were taken at the Boothbay Museum in one of the summers in the mid 1990’s when the various rail busses and rail cars visited. The Boothbay structures were painted in a two tone green scheme, somewhat reminiscent of the Grey (Gray) and Dark Green Maine Central “Pond Bottom” colour scheme applied to both the SR&RL and B&SR when these Two Footers were controlled by the MeC. The Wiscasset line also applied a similar two toned scheme using Light Green and Dark Green. Chris McChesney writes;-  The Dark Green on the WW&F was a little lighter than the Dark Green on the MEC/SR&RL/B&SR. The MEC Dark Green was actually pretty dark and there are several original structures in original Dark Green to prove this.

 

tssco4

Shows the Boothbay structure colour scheme  in the shade – and an over-heating rail bus!

tssco3

Shows the Boothbay structure colour scheme in bright daylight (in the distance)

tssco2

These two shots show the Sandy River Museum and their structure colour scheme, again on a summers’ day in the 1990’s. Presumably, this is another attempt at the Maine Central “Pond Bottom” colour scheme.

tssco1

The following two pictures were taken at the Conway Scenic Railway at North Conway, NH – a favourite journey break place for me in my travels initially for the model shop that used to be in the block of shops to the right of the first picture and later to indulge in a treat of Ben and Jerry’s ice cream, ideally sat on their patio overlooking the yard – close to my idea of heaven – watching trains and eating Ben and Jerry’s!

tssco09

 

tssco10

This picture has been included because it shows three different appearances of colour schemes, note the differences between the crossing shanty, the freight shed in the distance behind it and the loco shed to the left. Sort of confirms the opening comment of how difficult it is to describe colours and colour schemes………more anon…….stay tuned!

Discussions are welcomed on any subject to do with this posting, apart from the spelling of colour.